cerebellar cortex


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to cerebellar cortex: cerebellum, neocerebellum, Archicerebellum, Purkinje cells, molecular layer of cerebellum

cortex

 [kor´teks] (pl. cor´tices) (L.)
the outer layer of an organ or other structure, as distinguished from its inner substance or medulla. adj., adj cor´tical.
adrenal cortex (cortex of adrenal gland) the outer, firm layer comprising the larger part of the adrenal gland; it secretes mineralocorticoids, androgens, and glucocorticoids.
cerebellar cortex the superficial gray matter of the cerebellum.
cerebral cortex (cortex cerebra´lis) the convoluted layer of gray matter covering each cerebral hemisphere. See also brain.
renal cortex the granular outer layer of the kidney, composed mainly of glomeruli and convoluted tubules, extending in columns between the pyramids that constitute the renal medulla.
striate cortex part of the occipital lobe that receives the fibers of the optic radiation and serves as the primary receiving area for vision. Called also first visual area.
visual cortex the area of the occipital lobe of the cerebral cortex concerned with vision; the striate cortex is also called the first visual area, and the adjacent second and third visual areas serve as its association areas.

cer·e·bel·lar cor·tex

the thin gray surface layer of the cerebellum, consisting of an outer molecular layer or stratum moleculare [TA], a single layer of Purkinje cells (the Purkinje cell layer [TA] or stratum purkinjense [TA]), and an inner granular layer or stratum granulosum [TA].
Synonym(s): cortex cerebelli [TA]

cerebellar cortex

the superficial gray matter of the cerebellum covering the white substance in the medullary core. It consists of two layers, an external molecular layer and an internal granule cell layer. Also called cortical substance of cerebellum.

cer·e·bel·lar cor·tex

(ser-ĕ-bel'ăr kōr'teks)
The thin gray surface layer of the cerebellum, consisting of an outer molecular layer or stratum moleculare, a single layer of Purkinje cells (the ganglionic layer), and an inner granular layer or stratum granulosum.

cerebellar

pertaining to the cerebellum.

cerebellar abiotrophy
occurs in cattle, pigs and dogs. Affected young are normal at birth but at an early age ataxia and signs of cerebellar dysfunction appear, often progressing to complete immobilization. Cerebral function is usually normal. An inherited basis is suspected. In Kerry blue terriers, it is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Called also cerebellar neuronal abiotrophy.
cerebellar agenesis
absence of the cerebellum due to its non-appearance in the embryo.
cerebellar aplasia
see cerebellar atrophy (below).
cerebellar ataxia
the incoordination of gait characterized by exaggerated movements. There is no paresis. There is exaggerated strength and distance of movement—hypermetria. Caused usually by damage to the cerebellum or to the spinocerebellar tracts. May be congenital due to cerebellar atrophy or acquired due to inflammation or malacia of the cerebellum.
cerebellar atrophy
degeneration and loss of cells—Purkinje and granular cells of the cerebellum. Present at birth or soon after, is congenital in sheep, cattle, Arab horses, dogs and cats. Some of the diseases are inherited, some are known to be due to virus infection in utero, e.g. bovine virus diarrhea, feline panleukopenia. Some are in fact abiotrophies, premature aging of tissues. In the latter the animals are normal at birth but develop classical signs later. Segmental atrophy occurs in pigs but is asymptomatic.
cerebellar coning
see cerebellar lipping (below), brain herniation.
cerebellar cortex
the superficial gray matter of the cerebellum.
cerebellar dysfunction
see cerebellar ataxia (above).
cerebellar dysmelinogenesis
recorded in Chow Chow dogs; characterized by congenital head tremor.
feline cerebellar ataxia
see feline panleukopenia.
cerebellar hypomyelinogenesis
abnormally reduced myelination in the cerebellum; characterized clinically by severe neonatal tremor.
cerebellar hypoplasia
deficiency of cells of the cerebellum, the degree and distribution of which is variable. See cerebellar atrophy (above).
inherited cerebellar defects
includes cerebellar abiotrophy, atrophy, agenesis, hypoplasia, neuraxonal dystrophy.
cerebellar lipping
caused by diffuse cerebral edema. The vermis of the cerebellum protrudes through the foramen magnum and lies like a tongue over the medulla.
cerebellar neuronal abiotrophy
see cerebellar abiotrophy (above).
cerebellar neuraxonal dystrophy
reported in collie sheepdogs. The lesion is limited to axons and there are no lesions in the cerebellar folial neurons.
cerebellar syndrome
see cerebellar ataxia (above).

cortex

pl. cortices [L.] an outer layer, as the bark of the trunk or root of a tree, or the outer layer of an organ or other structure, as distinguished from its inner substance.

adrenal cortex
the outer, firm layer comprising the larger part of the adrenal gland; it secretes a number of hormones. See corticosteroid, aldosterone, mineralocorticoid, glucocorticoid.
cerebellar cortex
the superficial gray matter of the cerebellum.
cerebral cortex, cortex cerebri
the convoluted layer of gray matter covering each cerebral hemisphere. See also cerebral cortex.
renal cortex
the smooth-textured outer layer of the kidney, composed mainly of renal corpuscles and convoluted tubules, extending in columns between the pyramids.
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers conducted a neuropathological assessment of cerebral (frontal, occipital, anterior and posterior cingulate) cortex and cerebellar cortex tissue from the 87 end-of-life patients who underwent a florbetaben PET scan before death.
Histologic appearance of cerebellar cortex at 27 to 28 weeks gestation, before Lamina dissicans is ablated (A and B), at 30 weeks gestation after Lamina dissicans is ablated (C) and at 2 months postnatal age (D) (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnifications; 32[A].
These data revealed that ETS exposure during cerebellar cortex development prominently influenced mitochondria and, in particular, processes involved in aerobic function.
GPC promotes the growth, repair, and increased expression of nerve growth factor receptors in the cerebellar cortex, a brain region responsible for coordination and movement control.
6) Autopsy series in aceruloplasminemia have demonstrated severe iron deposition and extensive neuronal loss within the neostriatum, dentate nucleus, and thalamus and marked loss of Perkinje cells within the cerebellar cortex.
During sustained attention, both DHA dose groups had significantly greater changes from baseline in activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex than did the placebo group, and the low-dose and high-dose DHA groups had greater decreases in the occipital cortex and cerebellar cortex, respectively.
The time course of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression paralleled that of FA in the cerebellar cortex from 20 weeks of gestation upto the GA at which the FA reached its peak value (28 weeks GA).
Alcohol-induced granule cell loss in the cerebellar cortex of the adult rat.
There was relative sparing of the occipital and sensorimotor cortex and very low uptake in the cerebellar cortex.
19,20) Neurons projecting from the inferior olivary nucleus to the cerebellar nuclei and cerebellar cortex are also necessary for vestibular compensation.
Of late, Leapman and his colleagues have been peering into freeze-dried sections of mouse brain cells, mostly from the cerebellar cortex.

Full browser ?