cephalometric radiograph


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radiograph

 [ra´de-o-graf″]
an image or record produced on exposed or processed film by radiography.
Relative positions of x-ray tube, patient, and film necessary to make the radiograph shown. Bones tend to stop diagnostic x-rays, but soft tissue does not. This results in the light and dark regions that form the image. From Thompson et al., 1994.
bite-wing radiograph a type of dental radiograph that reveals the crowns, necks, and coronal thirds of the roots of both the upper and lower posterior teeth, as well as the dental arches, produced using bite-wing film.
cephalometric radiograph a radiograph of the head, including the mandible, in full lateral view; used to make measurements; called also cephalogram.
flat plate radiograph a radiograph that visualizes abdominal organs and some abnormalities. It is usually one of the first diagnostic studies performed in assessing a patient for gastrointestinal disorders; no special physical preparation of the patient is necessary.
panoramic radiograph a type of extraoral body-section radiograph on which the entire maxilla or mandible can be depicted on a single film.

ceph·a·lo·met·ric ra·di·o·graph

a radiographic view of the jaws and skull permitting measurement.
Synonym(s): cephalogram

cephalometric radiograph

[sef′əlōmet′rik rā′dē·ōgraf]
a radiograph of the head, including the mandible, in full lateral view, used for making cranial measurements. Also called cephalogram.

ceph·a·lo·met·ric ra·di·o·graph

(sefă-lō-metrik rādē-ō-graf)
Radiographic view of the jaws and skull permitting measurement.
Synonym(s): cephalogram.

ceph·a·lo·met·ric ra·di·o·graph

(sefă-lō-metrik rādē-ō-graf)
X-ray view of jaws and cranium to allow their measurement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Standardized lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken before surgery (T1) and at longest follow-up (T2) intervals.
The soft tissue measurements used to evaluate the facial profile changes in this study were made using pre and post-treatment lateral cephalometric radiographs taken at the beginning and the end of treatment.
Active CH type 1 growth can usually be determined by worsening functional and aesthetic changes with serial assessments (preferably at 6- to 12-month intervals) consisting of 1) clinical evaluation; 2) dental analysis with orthodontically trimmed models or articulator-mounted models in centric relation; and 3) radiographic evaluation by superimposition including lateral cephalometric radiographs, frontal cephalometric radiographs (particularly helpful in unilateral CH cases), and lateral cephalometric tomograms that include the TMJ, mandibular ramus, and body.