centrifugal

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centrifugal

 [sen-trif´u-gal]
1. moving away from a center.
2. efferent (def. 1).

cen·trif·u·gal

(sen-trif'yū-găl),
1. Denoting the direction of the force pulling an object outward (away) from an axis of rotation.
2. Sometimes, by analogy, extended to describe any movement away from a center. Compare: eccentric (2).
[L. centrum, center, + fugio, to flee]

centrifugal

/cen·trif·u·gal/ (sen-trif´ah-gal) efferent (1).

centrifugal

(sĕn-trĭf′yə-gəl, -trĭf′ə-)
adj.
1. Moving or directed away from a center or axis.
2. Operated by means of centrifugal force.
3. Physiology Transmitting nerve impulses away from the central nervous system; efferent.
4. Botany Developing or progressing outward from a center or axis, as in a flower cluster in which the oldest flowers are in the center and the youngest flowers are near the edge.
5. Tending or directed away from centralization, as of authority: "In a feverish explosion of centrifugal nationalism, one after another of the empire's ethnic groups proclaimed independence" (Adam Hochschild).

cen·trif′u·gal·ism n.
cen·trif′u·gal·ly adv.

centrifugal

[sentrif′yəgəl]
1 denoting a force that is directed outward, away from a central point or axis. The force does not actually exist, but is a manifestation of inertia. See also centripetal force.
2 pertaining to a direction away from the head.

cen·trif·u·gal

(sen-trifyū-găl)
1. Denoting the direction of the force pulling an object outward (away) from an axis of rotation.
2. Sometimes, by analogy, extended to describe any movement away from a center.
Compare: eccentric (2)
[L. centrum, center, + fugio, to flee]

centrifugal

literally, 'centre-fleeing' . centrifugal force apparent (inertial) force on an object and centrifugal acceleration apparent (inertial) acceleration of an object, imagined by a moving observer who is rotating. For example, if a hammer thrower is rotating, all objects in his surroundings appear to him to be moving, i.e. to have centrifugal acceleration, whilst the hammer itself appears to stay still, yet he is having to apply a centripetal acceleration to keep it moving in a circle. Therefore, by Newton's first law there must be a balancing (centrifugal) acceleration, but this is imaginary since due only to the rotation of the thrower himself, whilst the hammer is not actually stationary.

cen·trif·u·gal

(sen-trifyū-găl)
Denoting direction of the force pulling an object outward (away) from an axis of rotation.
[L. centrum, center, + fugio, to flee]

centrifugal

moving away from a center.