central scotoma


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Related to central scotoma: optic neuritis, centrocecal scotoma

scotoma

 [sko-to´mah] (Gr.)
1. an area of lost or depressed vision within the visual field, surrounded by an area of less depressed or of normal vision.
2. mental scotoma. adj., adj scotom´atous.
absolute scotoma an area within the visual field in which perception of light is entirely lost.
annular scotoma a circular area of depressed vision surrounding the point of fixation.
arcuate scotoma an arc-shaped defect of vision arising in an area near the blind spot and extending toward it.
central scotoma an area of depressed vision corresponding with the fixation point and interfering with or abolishing central vision.
centrocecal scotoma a horizontal oval defect in the visual field situated between and embracing both the fixation point and the blind spot.
color scotoma an isolated area of depressed or defective vision for color in the visual field.
hemianopic scotoma depressed or lost vision affecting half of the central visual field; see also hemianopia.
mental scotoma in psychiatry, a figurative blind spot in a person's psychological awareness, the patient being unable to gain insight into and to understand his mental problems; lack of insight.
negative scotoma a scotoma appearing as a blank spot in the visual field; the patient is unaware of it, and it is detected only by examination.
peripheral scotoma an area of depressed vision toward the periphery of the visual field.
physiologic scotoma that area of the visual field corresponding with the optic disk, in which the photosensitive receptors are absent.
positive scotoma one which appears as a dark spot in the visual field.
relative scotoma an area of the visual field in which perception of light is only diminished, or loss is restricted to light of certain wavelengths.
ring scotoma annular s.
scintillating scotoma blurring of vision with the sensation of a luminous appearance before the eyes, with a zigzag, wall-like outline; called also teichopsia.

cen·tral sco·to·ma

a scotoma involving the fixation point.

central scotoma

Etymology: Gk, kentron + skotos, darkness, oma, tumor
an area of blindness or site of depressed vision involving the macula of the retina.

cen·tral sco·to·ma

(sen'trăl skō-tō'mă)
A scotoma involving the fixation point.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, like the other patients, both also described a persistent central scotoma despite normal functional Snellen visual acuities.
A computer and video display-based system for training eccentric viewing in macular degeneration with an absolute central scotoma.
Limited portability and the lack of access to a microperimeter or a tangent screen have led to the development of more simplified methods of testing the boundaries of a central scotoma for training in eccentric viewing.
A Patient Presenting with Bilateral Central Scotomas after Dengue Fever.
Nilsson reported that, since the 1970s, a low-vision service in Sweden has been instructing patients in the use of a trained retinal locus (TRL) in a retinal area that is "more advantageous to reading," defined as above or below an absolute central scotoma as opposed to the left or right of the scotoma [25].
Patients with AMD and large absolute central scotoma can be trained successfully to use eccentric viewing, as demonstrated in scanning laser ophthalmoscope.
Visual acuity is often about 6/18 with a relative central scotoma, moderate photophobia and low-grade nystagmus; the foveal mosaic is irregular and reduced in density.
Since the fovea is specialized for fine resolution and excellent visual acuity in a way that the peripheral retina is not, a person with a central scotoma must use magnification or large-print text.
a Bi-temporal superior quadrantanopia b Central scotoma c Complete bitemporal hemianopia d Arcuate scotoma D [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] A myopic patient aged 55 presents for a routine eye examination.
The person whose PRL is to the left of the central scotoma needs different strategies from the person whose PRL is above or to the right of the scotoma.
34) Visual acuity ranges from near-normal to approximately 6/60 and patients may be aware of a central scotoma.
The most frequent of these diseases is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), in which foveal vision is often impaired by a central scotoma that impairs vision of fine detail and causes problems with reading and recognizing faces.

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