central necrosis


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Related to central necrosis: Frank necrosis, necroses, necrotized

necrosis

 [nĕ-kro´sis, ne-kro´sis] (Gr.)
the morphological changes indicative of cell death caused by enzymatic degradation.
aseptic necrosis necrosis without infection or inflammation.
acute tubular necrosis acute renal failure with mild to severe damage or necrosis of tubule cells, usually secondary to either nephrotoxicity, ischemia after major surgery, trauma (see crush syndrome), severe hypovolemia, sepsis, or burns. See also lower nephron nephrosis.
Balser's fatty necrosis gangrenous pancreatitis with omental bursitis and disseminated patches of necrosis of fatty tissues.
bridging necrosis septa of confluent necrosis bridging adjacent central veins of hepatic lobules and portal triads characteristic of subacute hepatic necrosis.
caseous necrosis caseation (def. 2).
central necrosis necrosis affecting the central portion of an affected bone, cell, or lobule of the liver.
cheesy necrosis caseation (def. 2).
coagulation necrosis death of cells, the protoplasm of the cells becoming fixed and opaque by coagulation of the protein elements, the cellular outline persisting for a long time.
colliquative necrosis liquefactive necrosis.
fat necrosis necrosis in which fat is broken down into fatty acids and glycerol, usually occurring in subcutaneous tissue as a result of trauma.
liquefactive necrosis necrosis in which the necrotic material becomes softened and liquefied.
massive hepatic necrosis massive, usually fatal, necrosis of the liver, a rare complication of viral hepatitis (fulminant hepatitis) that may also result from exposure to hepatotoxins or from drug hypersensitivity.
moist necrosis necrosis in which the dead tissue is wet and soft.
postpartum pituitary necrosis see postpartum pituitary necrosis.
selective myocardial cell necrosis myofibrillar degeneration.
subcutaneous fat necrosis of newborn a benign, self-limited disease affecting term newborns and young infants, characterized by circumscribed, indurated, nodular areas of fat necrosis. It is thought to be related to trauma on bony prominences during delivery, hypothermia, asphyxia, or maternal diabetes; it usually resolves spontaneously by 2 to 4 weeks with no scarring. Called also adiponecrosis neonatorum or subcutanea.
Zenker's necrosis hyaline degeneration and necrosis of striated muscle; called also Zenker's degeneration.

cen·tral ne·cro·sis

necrosis involving the deeper or inner portions of a tissue, or an organ or its units.

central necrosis

Etymology: Gk, kentron, central, nekros, dead, osis, condition
death of the central part of a tissue or organ.

cen·tral ne·cro·sis

(sen'trăl nĕ-krō'sis)
Cell death involving the deeper or inner portions of a tissue, or an organ or its units.

necrosis

pl. necroses [Gr.] the morphological changes indicative of cell death caused by enzymatic degradation.

aseptic necrosis
necrosis without infection or inflammation.
caseous necrosis
necrosis in which the tissue is soft, dry and cheesy, occurring typically in tuberculosis.
central necrosis
necrosis affecting the central portion of an affected bone, cell or lobule of the liver.
cheesy necrosis
that in which the tissue resembles cottage cheese; most often seen in tuberculosis.
coagulation necrosis
death of cells, the protoplasm of the cells becoming fixed and opaque by coagulation of the protein elements, the cellular outline persisting for a long time.
colliquative necrosis
see liquefactive necrosis (below).
liquefactive necrosis
necrosis in which the necrotic material becomes softened and liquefied.
moist necrosis
necrosis in which the dead tissue is wet and soft.
Zenker's necrosis
hyaline degeneration and necrosis of striated muscle; called also Zenker's degeneration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our study showed that RLNs with central necrosis were significantly larger and exhibited more FDG uptake than did those without central necrosis.
7) It is our opinion that the radiologically cystic appearance of our patient's tumor was attributable to the widespread area of central necrosis.
A computed tomography scan showing a large left renal cell carcinoma with central necrosis associated with regional lymphadenopathy.
The common imaging features of the hepatic metastases were: Medium to large size (3-8 cm) lesions ranging in number from single to multiple with heterogenous peripheral enhancement and central necrosis found in 8 cases, small (1-2 cm) innumerable peripherally enhancing lesions with central necrosis giving rise to a pseudo-cirrhosis appearance found in 6 cases, small and few with solid homogenous enhancement in 4, small (1-2 cm) multiple with peripheral enhancement and central necrosis in 1.
Although not used routinely, MRI allows better visualization of mass contours, central necrosis, vascular relationships, and extrahepatic extension of alveolar echinococcosis than does CT.
Similar to the breast carcinoma, the intra-ductal component may appear as a cribriform, papillary or solid growth pattern, often with comedo-like central necrosis.
Biopsy specimen from the right parotid gland revealed scattered granulomas with focal central necrosis.
Histologic examination revealed an intramural lesion composed entirely of spindle and epithelioid histiocytes arranged in a palisaded pattern, with central necrosis (Figure 1) similar to the features of a rheumatoid nodule.
Eosinophilic abscesses can feature central necrosis.
CT and MRI of thymic carcinoid reveal a large, heterogeneous, lobulated mass, occasionally with areas of hemorrhage and central necrosis.
By the end of the first week, central necrosis and ulceration had produced a whitish patch (Figure 2).
Certain parameters like cystic/ central necrosis, borders and absent perfusion were considered as not significant parameters at end of study.

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