central auditory processing disorder


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central auditory processing disorder (CAPD)

difficulty in processing and interpreting auditory stimuli in the absence of a peripheral hearing loss, usually resulting from a problem in the brainstem or cerebral cortex. Children with CAPD often have difficulty with written language tasks and may exhibit other learning disabilities as well.

auditory processing disorder

A generic term for a condition caused by ear infections and head trauma characterised by difficulty in processing of auditory information in the CNS.

Auditory processing disorders—difficulties in:
• Sound localisation and lateralisation;
• Auditory discrimination;
• Auditory pattern recognition;
• Temporal aspects of audition, including
    — Temporal integration,
    — Temporal discrimination (e.g., temporal gap detection),
    — Temporal ordering and temporal masking;
• Auditory performance in competing acoustic signals (including dichotic listening);
• Auditory performance with degraded acoustic signals.

central auditory processing disorder

Audiology The inability to differentiate, recognize, or understand sounds in a person with normal hearing and intelligence

central auditory processing disorder

A condition, sometimes confused with attention deficit disorder or hearing disorders, in which a child has normal hearing and intelligence, but cannot interpret sounds and their correct contexts or meanings.
References in periodicals archive ?
Problems related to central auditory processing disorders (CAPD) often present with problems related to language disorders, sensory integration dysfunction, and learning disabilities (LD).
Multidimensional approach to the differential diagnosis of central auditory processing disorders in children.
Modality specificity as a criterion for diagnosing central auditory processing disorders.
Controversies in the screening of central auditory processing disorders.
Campbell, is lecturer in audiology at the department of communication pathology at the University of Pretoria with special interests in central auditory processing disorders and diagnostic audiology.
The greatest proportion of the program directors whose programs had no specific course reported that less than 6 hours of other courses focused on pediatric counseling (44%) and on central auditory processing disorders (62%).
Sixty-nine percent reported having taken no course that dealt specifically with pediatric electrophysiology, 56% had no course that dealt with pediatric central auditory processing disorders, and 51% had no course that dealt with pediatric counseling.
The greatest proportion of those audiologists who had no specific coursework reported that less than 6 hours of other courses focused on pediatric amplification (55%), on pediatric habilitation (46%), on pediatric counseling (62%), on pediatric electrophysiology (66%), and on central auditory processing disorders (74%).
The largest proportion of program directors reported that their graduates obtained less than 6 hours with tests for functional hearing loss and central auditory processing disorders evaluations.
The greatest proportion of program directors with school system affiliations reported that their graduates obtained 16 to 30 hours with central auditory processing disorders, while the greatest proportion of those not affiliated reported that their graduates obtained less than 6 hours with central auditory processing disorders.
The greatest proportion of audiologists whose program was affiliated obtained 16 to 30 hours with central auditory processing disorders, while the greatest proportion of those whose programs were not affiliated obtained less than 6 hours.

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