centre

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centre

See center.

cen·ter

(sen'tĕr) [TA]
1. The middle point of a body.
2. A center of any kind, especially an anatomic center.
Synonym(s): centrum [TA] , centre.
3. A group of nerve cells governing a specific function.
4. A health care or therapeutic facility performing a particular function or service for people in the surrounding area.
Synonym(s): centre.
[L. centrum; G. kentron]

centre

group of nerve cells governing a specific function
  • Brocha's centre small area within left cerebral hemisphere; an essential component of speech mechanisms; if affected by cerebrovascular accident (CVA) (i.e. CVA affecting the right side of the body), aphasia results

  • ossification centre bone area/areas where calcification of the osteoid matrix begins; primary ossification centre is usually within the shaft of a long bone; a secondary ossification centre occurs in an epiphysis or a tuberosity

  • Wernicke's centre a large area of the left cerebral hemisphere essential to the understanding and formulation of coherent speech; when affected by cerebrovascular accident (manifesting on the right side of the body) communication and speech difficulties result

cen·ter

(sen'tĕr) [TA]
1. The middle point of a body; loosely, the interior of a body, especially an anatomic center.
2. A group of nerve cells governing a specific function.
[L. centrum; G. kentron]
References in classic literature ?
Her affections seemed centered in the members of her own family; nor had she ever given Julia the least reason to believe she preferred her to her own sister, notwithstanding that sister was married, and beyond the years of romance.
There are many families where the whole interest of life is centered upon the dog.
And so the Colonial Office appointed John Clayton to a new post in British West Africa, but his confidential instructions centered on a thorough investigation of the unfair treatment of black British subjects by the officers of a friendly European power.