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censor

 [sen´ser]
a term used by Freud to refer to the mental faculty that guards the border between the unconscious and preconscious, preventing unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming into consciousness unless disguised, as in dreams. In Freud's later theory, the actions of the censor (displacement, condensation, symbolism, and repression) are considered defense mechanisms of the ego and superego.

cen·sor

(sen'sōr),
In psychoanalytic theory, the psychic barrier that prevents certain unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming to consciousness unless they are so cloaked or disguised as to be unrecognizable.
[L. a judge, critic, fr. censeo, to value, judge]

censor

/cen·sor/ (sen´ser) the mental faculty that prevents unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming into consciousness unless disguised, as in dreams.

censor

(sĕn′sər)
n.
Psychology The agent in the unconscious that is responsible for censorship.
tr.v. cen·sored, cen·soring, cen·sors
To examine and expurgate.

cen′sor·a·ble adj.
cen·so′ri·al (sĕn-sôr′ē-əl) adj.

censor

Etymology: L, censere, to assess
1 a person who monitors or evaluates books, newspapers, plays, works of art, speech, or other means of expression in order to suppress certain kinds of information.
2 (in psychoanalysis) a psychic suppression that allows unconscious thoughts to rise to consciousness only if they are heavily disguised.

cen·sor

(sen'sŏr)
psychoanalytic theory The psychic barrier that prevents certain unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming to consciousness.
[L. a judge, critic, fr. censeo, to value, judge]

censor

A Freudian idea for the supposed agency that distorts or symbolizes repressed unpleasant material in the unconscious so that it need not be directly recognized either in dreams or in waking awareness. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.

censor

a member of a committee on ethics or for critical examination of a medical or other society.
References in periodicals archive ?
He did not say what new standards he would bring to censorship or how he would deal with censors who acted on whim.
Compounding their anger, military censors continued to refuse to allow any other news organization to send their own stories, meaning the AP would continue to have an exclusive for a day.
The first Censor under the 1923 Act, James Montgomery, together with the first Chairman of the Appeal Board, William Magennis, were the first to deal with this phenomenon.
When you upset the censors with your films, as you often did, were you trying to push buttons consciously or was it something that was organic, something that was just there in your work?
Field, then a high school student in Chicago, researched the history of efforts to censor The Wizard of Oz.
Any video which arrives in Ireland without a classification is banned until the Film Censor has viewied it.
Neither of these novels was ever banned, the latter apparently because the censors assumed that the state and its order could not be threatened by so preposterous a premise.
The librarian is, by the very nature of his role in society, a censor.
Muslim sentiment Akshay Kumar's Khiladi 786 was initially banned in Pakistan because the censors declared that ' 786' is sacred to Muslims, and might ' hurt religious sentiments'.
Malaysia's first gay-themed movie could hit cinemas within months, its producer said, after government censors eased restrictions that have stifled the film industry here for decades.
According to a recent report published by the Committee to Protect Journalists, the Iranian regime is one of the leading Internet censors in the world; but international consortiums have now produced several programs designed to help evade regime censors.
Censors twice rejected the game earlier this year, saying it showed "casual sadism" and an "unrelenting focus on stalking and brutal slaying".