censoring


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cen·sor·ing

(sen'sōr-ing),
1. In epidemiology, loss of subjects from a follow-up study for various reasons.
2. Observations with unknown values from one end of a frequency distribution, beyond a measurement threshold.

cen·sor·ing

(sen'sŏr-ing)
1. epidemiology Loss of subjects from a follow-up study for unknown reasons.
2. Observations with unknown values from one end of a frequency distribution, beyond a measurement threshold.

censoring

in epidemiology, a loss of information from a study, whether by subjects dropping out of the study or because of infrequent measurement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Left censoring and bootstrapping of upper percentiles
In this study, induced percentile left censoring and bootstrapping were invoked to provide better estimates of the upper percentiles of wood strands.
For example, the best-fitting distribution for Mill A when censoring at the 0.
Descriptive statistics and distributions of strand thickness without censoring
At all censoring percentiles with the highest outlier removed, the data from Mill B followed a smallest extreme value (SEV) distribution.
For Mills A, C, and D at these censoring values (0.
For Mill B, induced percentile censoring did not help much.
For Mill F, induced percentile left censoring reduced the length of the confidence interval for the upper percentiles (i.
As censoring quantiles increased, the validation intervals moved left of the training data sets, meaning the training set were more conservative.
Induced percentile left censoring slightly reduced the length of the confidence interval estimates for Mill B (0.
Applying a forced censoring technique with accelerated modeling for improving estimation of extremely small percentiles of strengths.
Stop censoring the words that describe who I am," The Telegraph quoted Pang Khee Teik, a prominent Malaysian arts commentator, as writing in a letter sent out to several media organisations.