censor


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censor

 [sen´ser]
a term used by Freud to refer to the mental faculty that guards the border between the unconscious and preconscious, preventing unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming into consciousness unless disguised, as in dreams. In Freud's later theory, the actions of the censor (displacement, condensation, symbolism, and repression) are considered defense mechanisms of the ego and superego.

cen·sor

(sen'sōr),
In psychoanalytic theory, the psychic barrier that prevents certain unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming to consciousness unless they are so cloaked or disguised as to be unrecognizable.
[L. a judge, critic, fr. censeo, to value, judge]

censor

/cen·sor/ (sen´ser) the mental faculty that prevents unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming into consciousness unless disguised, as in dreams.

censor

(sĕn′sər)
n.
Psychology The agent in the unconscious that is responsible for censorship.
tr.v. cen·sored, cen·soring, cen·sors
To examine and expurgate.

cen′sor·a·ble adj.
cen·so′ri·al (sĕn-sôr′ē-əl) adj.

censor

Etymology: L, censere, to assess
1 a person who monitors or evaluates books, newspapers, plays, works of art, speech, or other means of expression in order to suppress certain kinds of information.
2 (in psychoanalysis) a psychic suppression that allows unconscious thoughts to rise to consciousness only if they are heavily disguised.

cen·sor

(sen'sŏr)
psychoanalytic theory The psychic barrier that prevents certain unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming to consciousness.
[L. a judge, critic, fr. censeo, to value, judge]

censor

A Freudian idea for the supposed agency that distorts or symbolizes repressed unpleasant material in the unconscious so that it need not be directly recognized either in dreams or in waking awareness. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.

censor

a member of a committee on ethics or for critical examination of a medical or other society.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under this definition, the student who objected to the gruesome readings in Hielsberg's class was making no attempt to censor but was merely expressing a personal objection to having to listen to extremely offensive speech.
Muslim sentiment Akshay Kumar's Khiladi 786 was initially banned in Pakistan because the censors declared that ' 786' is sacred to Muslims, and might ' hurt religious sentiments'.
The anti-piracy cell of the police has visited a studio in the state capital and also collected some data from the Censor Board office here.
It is pointed out that the Irish film censors were not at all prepared for the impact video would have, which became demonstrated by the fact that it took fifteen years for video censorship to be fully introduced (in 1994).
When you upset the censors with your films, as you often did, were you trying to push buttons consciously or was it something that was organic, something that was just there in your work?
joelbrags: "James Bond seen visibly shaken, not stirred at news of Indian Censor Board cutting out kissing scenes.
Azam Khan said that censor board was necessary for the production of quality and cultured dramas and films to guide the society in a right direction.
While most films involved in such a situation draw the Censor BoardeIUs ire over sex, violence or language profanity, SalmaneIUs film, which is in every way sanitised Sooraj Barjatya- brand family fare, is stuck over title issues.
com)-- An innovative new product designed to provide a highly effective measure of automotive theft prevention, the Theft Censor, has been developed by Savina Ruppaner and Nikolaos Andreopoulos of Astoria, New York.
ANHRI demanded that the Egyptian authorities cease the censorship of newspapers or TV channels, even if they have an opposing opinion or cover news the government wants to censor.
If this is the case, why did the UK government feel the need to censor a recent report entitled "Shale Gas: Rural Economy" with 63 separate sections blacked out?