cementum


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Related to cementum: acellular cementum

cementum

 [se-men´tum]
the bonelike connective tissue covering the root of a tooth and assisting in tooth support.
 Cementum covering the anatomical root of an anterior tooth. Dorland's, 2000.

ce·ment

(sē-ment'), [TA]
1. A layer of bonelike, mineralized tissue covering the dentin of the root and neck of a tooth that anchors the fibers of the periodontal ligament. Synonym(s): cementum [TA]
2. In dentistry, a nonmetallic material used for luting, filling, or permanent or temporary restorative purposes, made by mixing components into a plastic mass that sets, or as an adherent sealer in attaching various dental restorations in or on the tooth.
[L. caementum, rough quarry stone, fr. caedo, to cut]

cementum

/ce·men·tum/ (sĕ-men´tum) the bonelike connective tissue covering the root of a tooth and assisting in tooth support.

cementum

(sĭ-mĕn′təm) also

cement

(-mĕnt′)
n.
A bonelike substance covering the root of a tooth.

cementum

[simen′təm]
the bonelike connective tissue that covers the roots of the teeth and helps to support them by providing a place of attachment for the periodontal ligament fibers and overlying dentin.

ce·men·tum

(sĕ-men'tŭm) [TA]
A layer of bonelike mineralized tissue covering the dentin of the root and neck of a tooth that blends with the fibers of the periodontal ligament.
[L. caementum, rough quarry stone, fr. caedo, to cut]

cementum

The layer of calcified substance covering the root of a tooth.

ce·ment

(sĕ-ment') [TA]
1. In dentistry, nonmetallic material used for luting, filling, or permanent or temporary restorative purposes, made by mixing components into a plastic mass that sets, or as an adherent sealer in attaching various dental restorations in or on the tooth.
Synonym(s): cementum [TA] .
2. A layer of bonelike, mineralized tissue covering dentin of root and neck of a tooth that anchors fibers of the periodontal ligament.
[L. caementum, rough quarry stone, fr. caedo, to cut]

cementum (səmen´tum),

n a specialized, calcified connective tissue that covers the anatomic root of a tooth, giving attachment to the periodontal ligament.
Enlarge picture
Cementum.
cementum, abnormalities of,
n.pl includes the reversal lines in the cementum, which represent bone tissue resorption or cementum resorption. Cementicles are calcified epithelial cells found in older persons. Hypercementosis is cementum overgrowth on the roots. See also reversal lines, cementicle, and hypercementosis.
cementum, acellular,
n the cementum that contains no cementocytes.
cementum, cellular,
n the portion of the calcified substance covering the root surfaces of the teeth. It is bonelike and contains cementocytes embedded within lacunae, with protoplasmic processes of the cementocytes coursing through canaliculi that anastomose with canaliculi of adjacent lacunae. The lacunae are dispersed through a calcified matrix arranged in lamellar form. It is localized primarily at the apical portion of the root but may deposit over the acellular cementum or serve to repair areas of cemental resorption.
cementum, collagen fibrils of,
n the fibrils that penetrate the cementum surface and are continuous with the periodontal fibers necessary for tooth support.
cementum, lamellar,
n the cementum in which layers of appositional cementum are arranged in a sheaflike pattern, the layers of cementum being more or less parallel to the cemental surface and demarcated by incremental lines that represent periods of inactivity of cementum formation.
cementum, necrotic,
n nonvital cementum that is situated coronal to the bottom of the periodontal pocket.
cementum, properties of,
n.pl the calcified, avascular connective tissue that is derived from the dental sac and functions in protecting the roots of teeth.
cementum, secondary,
n the term used to describe all subsequent layers of cementum formed after the primary layer. It may be cellular or acellular.

cementum

the bonelike connective tissue covering the root of a tooth and assisting in tooth support.
References in periodicals archive ?
The major locations of positive OPG/RANKL expression were the periodontal membrane, cementum, and osteo-clasts in the resorption bone pits (Fig.
It has been recently reported that coronal displacement of cementum with age.
The age of five additional males could not be distinguished between yearling and two-year-old due to indistinct or irregular cementum patterns.
Fibrin deposits in the wall of the cyst can become mineralized enough to produce concentric lamellar structures that resemble cementum, and these calcified deposits can undergo ossification.
Grazers build a more hypsodont, more complex tooth that usually contains cementum surrounding the enamel.
These tough bacteria travel through the dentin tubules, seep through the structure of the cementum, and can escape into the bloodstream.
On the illustrations, enamel bands are shown in white, dentine in black, and cementum is stippled.
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They may take dental and medical histories; take and record blood pressures; place and remove rubber dams and dental matrices; apply topical fluoride and topical anesthesia; apply desensitizing agents to cementum and dentin; insert nightguards and athletic mouth-guards; remove sutures and dressings; perform pulpal vitality tests; fabricate custom trays for dentures and partials; select impression trays; and take alginate impressions for study models, bleaching trays, night guards, and athletic mouth-guards.
The crowns of teeth, especially the bicuspids and molars, are bulbous in appearance, with a constriction at the junction of enamel and cementum.
This root is covered by a substance called cementum, much softer than enamel and more easily decayed by the attacking bacterial plaque constantly being formed in the mouth.