cellulose

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cellulose

 [sel´u-lōs]
a carbohydrate forming the skeleton of most plant structures and plant cells. It is the most abundant polysaccharide in nature and is the source of dietary fiber, preventing constipation by adding bulk to the stool. Good sources in the diet are vegetables, cereals, and fruits.
absorbable cellulose (oxidized cellulose) an absorbable oxidation product of cellulose, applied locally to stop bleeding.
cellulose sodium phosphate an insoluble, nonabsorbable cation exchange resin prepared from cellulose; it binds calcium and is used to prevent formation of calcium-containing kidney stones.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs),
A linear B1→4 glucan, composed of cellobiose residues, differing in this respect from starch, which is composed of maltose residues; it forms the basis of vegetable and wood fiber and is the most abundant organic compound; useful in providing bulk in the diet.
Synonym(s): cellulin
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose

/cel·lu·lose/ (sel´u-lōs) a rigid, colorless, unbranched, insoluble, long-chain polysaccharide, consisting of 3000 to 5000 glucose residues and forming the structure of most plant structures and of plant cells.
absorbable cellulose  oxidized c.
cellulose acetate  an acetylated cellulose used as a hemodialyzer membrane.
oxidized cellulose  an absorbable oxidation product of cellulose, used as a local hemostatic.
cellulose sodium phosphate  an insoluble, nonabsorbable cation exchange resin prepared from cellulose; it binds calcium and is used to prevent formation of calcium-containing renal calculi.

cellulose

(sĕl′yə-lōs′, -lōz′)
n.
A polysaccharide, (C6H10O5)n, that is composed of glucose monomers and is the main constituent of the cell walls of plants. It is used in the manufacture of numerous products, including paper, textiles, pharmaceuticals, and insulation.

cel′lu·lo′sic (-lō′sĭk, -zĭk) adj.

cellulose

[sel′yoo͡lōs]
Etymology: L, cellula, little cell
a colorless, insoluble, indigestible, transparent, solid polysaccharide that is the primary constituent of the cell walls of plants. In the diet it provides the bulk necessary for proper digestive tract functioning. Rich sources are fruits, such as apples and bananas, and legumes, bran, and green vegetables, especially celery. See also dietary fiber.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs)
An indigestible carbohydrate found in plants.
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose

A complex polysaccharide forming the structural elements in plants and forming ‘roughage’ in many vegetable foodstuffs. Cellulose cannot be digested to simpler sugars and remains in the intestine.

cellulose

a type of unbranched polysaccharide carbohydrate composed of from one to four linked (3-GLUCOSE units which can be hydrolysed by the enzyme CELLULASE. Cellulose is the main constituent of plant cell walls and is the most common organic compound on earth. It has high tensile strength because of H-bonding and is fully permeable.

cellulose (selˑ·y·lōs),

n an unbran-ched 1–4-beta-glucose polymer found in fruits, grains, seeds, and vegetables. A major dietary fiber, cellulose increases fecal size and weight because of its ability to bind water.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs)
A linear B1→4 glucan; forms the basis of vegetable and wood fiber and is the most abundant organic compound.
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose,

n the primary component of plant cell walls; provides the fiber and bulk necessary for optimal functioning of the digestive tract.
cellulose, oxidized
n cellulose, in the form of cotton, gauze, or paper, that has been more or less completely oxidized.

cellulose

a polysaccharide containing β1→4 linked glucose carbohydrate forming the skeleton of most plant structures and plant cells. In herbivores, digested by bacteria in the rumen or cecum, primarily to volatile fatty acids which can be used as a source of energy.

absorbable cellulose
an absorbable oxidation product of cellulose, applied locally to stop bleeding. Called also oxidized cellulose.
cellulose acetate
the most popular support field used in the electrophoresis of proteins.
oxidized cellulose
see absorbable cellulose (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
The patented Plantrose process uses supercritical water to reduce costs in conversion of biomass to cellulosic sugars, the critical intermediary for second generation biofuels and biochemicals.
Fewer than 423,000 gallons of the fuel was produced in 2013, while EISA would have required cellulosic use of 500 million gallons that year.
Since 2007, the Department of Energy has invested approximately $250 million to support the construction and technical development of cellulosic ethanol facilities.
Cellulosic ethanol has fallen far behind mandated blending targets since these were launched in 2010, partly because these were so ambitious from a standing start for an untested technology in the teeth of a financial crisis.
Difficulties ramping up commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol facilities prompted the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) late last year to slash the amount of cellulosic that must be produced this year.
Broin explains that the waste stream from POET's process will be used to create biogas-enough to power both the Project Liberty cellulosic plant and POET's adjacent grain-based ethanol plant.
The looming collapse of the cellulosic ethanol producers deserves more than passing notice for this reason: cellulosic ethanol--which has never been produced in commercial quantities--has been relentlessly hyped over the past few years by a panoply of politicians and promoters.
Cellulosic ethanol does not compete with food production and has the potential to decrease greenhouse gas emissions by 86 percent over that of today's fossil fuels.
Cellulosic biofuel company, Gulf Alternative Energy Corporation, today announced preprocessing technology that turns non-food plant material, or biomass, into extremely small particles that can more quickly and more cheaply be turned into ethanol.
One of the wraps on cellulosic ethanol is that at the end of the day, the energy--including water, enzymes and time-you put into the plant is more than what you get out of it.
Institut Francais du Petrole (Rueil Malmaison Cedex, France) has patented a process for producing cellulolytic and/or hemicellulolytic enzymes uses the residue from the ethanolic fermentation of enzymatic hydrolyzates of cellulosic or ligno-cellulosic materials.
Summary: DuPont Vice President & General Manager John Ranieri said the company's plans to bring its two advanced biofuels programs to market are on track and making significant technical progress toward the commercialization of biobutanol and the conversion of cellulosic feedstocks economically into biofuels.