cellulose


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cellulose

 [sel´u-lōs]
a carbohydrate forming the skeleton of most plant structures and plant cells. It is the most abundant polysaccharide in nature and is the source of dietary fiber, preventing constipation by adding bulk to the stool. Good sources in the diet are vegetables, cereals, and fruits.
absorbable cellulose (oxidized cellulose) an absorbable oxidation product of cellulose, applied locally to stop bleeding.
cellulose sodium phosphate an insoluble, nonabsorbable cation exchange resin prepared from cellulose; it binds calcium and is used to prevent formation of calcium-containing kidney stones.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs),
A linear B1→4 glucan, composed of cellobiose residues, differing in this respect from starch, which is composed of maltose residues; it forms the basis of vegetable and wood fiber and is the most abundant organic compound; useful in providing bulk in the diet.
Synonym(s): cellulin
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose

/cel·lu·lose/ (sel´u-lōs) a rigid, colorless, unbranched, insoluble, long-chain polysaccharide, consisting of 3000 to 5000 glucose residues and forming the structure of most plant structures and of plant cells.
absorbable cellulose  oxidized c.
cellulose acetate  an acetylated cellulose used as a hemodialyzer membrane.
oxidized cellulose  an absorbable oxidation product of cellulose, used as a local hemostatic.
cellulose sodium phosphate  an insoluble, nonabsorbable cation exchange resin prepared from cellulose; it binds calcium and is used to prevent formation of calcium-containing renal calculi.

cellulose

(sĕl′yə-lōs′, -lōz′)
n.
A polysaccharide, (C6H10O5)n, that is composed of glucose monomers and is the main constituent of the cell walls of plants. It is used in the manufacture of numerous products, including paper, textiles, pharmaceuticals, and insulation.

cel′lu·lo′sic (-lō′sĭk, -zĭk) adj.

cellulose

[sel′yoo͡lōs]
Etymology: L, cellula, little cell
a colorless, insoluble, indigestible, transparent, solid polysaccharide that is the primary constituent of the cell walls of plants. In the diet it provides the bulk necessary for proper digestive tract functioning. Rich sources are fruits, such as apples and bananas, and legumes, bran, and green vegetables, especially celery. See also dietary fiber.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs)
An indigestible carbohydrate found in plants.
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose

A complex polysaccharide forming the structural elements in plants and forming ‘roughage’ in many vegetable foodstuffs. Cellulose cannot be digested to simpler sugars and remains in the intestine.

cellulose

a type of unbranched polysaccharide carbohydrate composed of from one to four linked (3-GLUCOSE units which can be hydrolysed by the enzyme CELLULASE. Cellulose is the main constituent of plant cell walls and is the most common organic compound on earth. It has high tensile strength because of H-bonding and is fully permeable.

cellulose (selˑ·y·lōs),

n an unbran-ched 1–4-beta-glucose polymer found in fruits, grains, seeds, and vegetables. A major dietary fiber, cellulose increases fecal size and weight because of its ability to bind water.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs)
A linear B1→4 glucan; forms the basis of vegetable and wood fiber and is the most abundant organic compound.
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose,

n the primary component of plant cell walls; provides the fiber and bulk necessary for optimal functioning of the digestive tract.
cellulose, oxidized
n cellulose, in the form of cotton, gauze, or paper, that has been more or less completely oxidized.

cellulose

a polysaccharide containing β1→4 linked glucose carbohydrate forming the skeleton of most plant structures and plant cells. In herbivores, digested by bacteria in the rumen or cecum, primarily to volatile fatty acids which can be used as a source of energy.

absorbable cellulose
an absorbable oxidation product of cellulose, applied locally to stop bleeding. Called also oxidized cellulose.
cellulose acetate
the most popular support field used in the electrophoresis of proteins.
oxidized cellulose
see absorbable cellulose (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
Cherry said his organization was planning to offer further seminars on damp-sprayed cellulose and other green building strategies.
The USDA and DOE report "Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry" also projects production of 47 billion gallons of ethanol from cellulose by 2030.
Weimer says that the bacteria in a cow's stomach produce many different enzymes that break down the cellulose in grass and other plants in a cow's diet.
Bacterial cellulose was successfully extracted from the nata de coco product (Chaokoh coconut gel in syrup; Ampol Food Processing Ltd.
When testing different IL anions the results have shown that their interaction strength with the cellulose is in a declining order as follows: chloride anion > acetate anion > alkylphosphate anion > tetraflouroborate anion > hexaflourophosphate anion (Vitz et al.
Some types of cellulose ethers retard cement- hydration rigorously[4, 5].
In the past decade, FPInnovations has also done extensive research into the development of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), which is created using commercial bleached pulp that is broken down using strong acids.
These results indicated that the smaller microfibrillated cellulose particles, the higher efficiency of adsorption at the oil-water interfaces and the stronger inter-droplet network and cellulose network in the continuous phase had formed.
Methyl cellulose and derivatives, the fastest growing product type for cellulose ether & derivatives"
The produced nanocomposites have more strength in comparison with pure polymer because of covalent interactions and hydrogen bonds between polyurethane and cellulose nanochains.
In addition to its cellulose insulation products, Applegate manufactures a suite of eco-friendly products including Cotton Armor, a thermal/acoustic insulation blanket, board and wrap product for the construction and OEM markets.
Chemical modification of cellulose by graft copolymerization has generated interest among researchers because few commoner molecules change significantly a number of characteristics of the original natural polymer [5-8].