cellulose


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Related to cellulose: cellulose acetate, carboxymethyl cellulose, ethyl cellulose, Microcrystalline cellulose

cellulose

 [sel´u-lōs]
a carbohydrate forming the skeleton of most plant structures and plant cells. It is the most abundant polysaccharide in nature and is the source of dietary fiber, preventing constipation by adding bulk to the stool. Good sources in the diet are vegetables, cereals, and fruits.
absorbable cellulose (oxidized cellulose) an absorbable oxidation product of cellulose, applied locally to stop bleeding.
cellulose sodium phosphate an insoluble, nonabsorbable cation exchange resin prepared from cellulose; it binds calcium and is used to prevent formation of calcium-containing kidney stones.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs),
A linear B1→4 glucan, composed of cellobiose residues, differing in this respect from starch, which is composed of maltose residues; it forms the basis of vegetable and wood fiber and is the most abundant organic compound; useful in providing bulk in the diet.
Synonym(s): cellulin
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose

/cel·lu·lose/ (sel´u-lōs) a rigid, colorless, unbranched, insoluble, long-chain polysaccharide, consisting of 3000 to 5000 glucose residues and forming the structure of most plant structures and of plant cells.
absorbable cellulose  oxidized c.
cellulose acetate  an acetylated cellulose used as a hemodialyzer membrane.
oxidized cellulose  an absorbable oxidation product of cellulose, used as a local hemostatic.
cellulose sodium phosphate  an insoluble, nonabsorbable cation exchange resin prepared from cellulose; it binds calcium and is used to prevent formation of calcium-containing renal calculi.

cellulose

(sĕl′yə-lōs′, -lōz′)
n.
A polysaccharide, (C6H10O5)n, that is composed of glucose monomers and is the main constituent of the cell walls of plants. It is used in the manufacture of numerous products, including paper, textiles, pharmaceuticals, and insulation.

cel′lu·lo′sic (-lō′sĭk, -zĭk) adj.

cellulose

[sel′yoo͡lōs]
Etymology: L, cellula, little cell
a colorless, insoluble, indigestible, transparent, solid polysaccharide that is the primary constituent of the cell walls of plants. In the diet it provides the bulk necessary for proper digestive tract functioning. Rich sources are fruits, such as apples and bananas, and legumes, bran, and green vegetables, especially celery. See also dietary fiber.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs)
An indigestible carbohydrate found in plants.
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose

A complex polysaccharide forming the structural elements in plants and forming ‘roughage’ in many vegetable foodstuffs. Cellulose cannot be digested to simpler sugars and remains in the intestine.

cellulose

a type of unbranched polysaccharide carbohydrate composed of from one to four linked (3-GLUCOSE units which can be hydrolysed by the enzyme CELLULASE. Cellulose is the main constituent of plant cell walls and is the most common organic compound on earth. It has high tensile strength because of H-bonding and is fully permeable.

cellulose (selˑ·y·lōs),

n an unbran-ched 1–4-beta-glucose polymer found in fruits, grains, seeds, and vegetables. A major dietary fiber, cellulose increases fecal size and weight because of its ability to bind water.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs)
A linear B1→4 glucan; forms the basis of vegetable and wood fiber and is the most abundant organic compound.
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose,

n the primary component of plant cell walls; provides the fiber and bulk necessary for optimal functioning of the digestive tract.
cellulose, oxidized
n cellulose, in the form of cotton, gauze, or paper, that has been more or less completely oxidized.

cellulose

a polysaccharide containing β1→4 linked glucose carbohydrate forming the skeleton of most plant structures and plant cells. In herbivores, digested by bacteria in the rumen or cecum, primarily to volatile fatty acids which can be used as a source of energy.

absorbable cellulose
an absorbable oxidation product of cellulose, applied locally to stop bleeding. Called also oxidized cellulose.
cellulose acetate
the most popular support field used in the electrophoresis of proteins.
oxidized cellulose
see absorbable cellulose (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
Cellulose nanofibers have been characterized and extracted from algae (Valonia) (32), wood (33), tunicate (34), sugar beet (35), brown algae (Oomycota) (36), bacterial and commercially available microcrystalline cellulose (13).
There are hardly any blood clots at all with the bacterial cellulose, and the blood coagulates much more slowly than with the materials I used as a comparison," said molecular biologist Helen Fink.
In this investigation, the production of CMC using palm kernel cake extracted cellulose was investigated.
With industrial biotech processes ready for deployment and production -- by companies such as Abengoa, Iogen, Broin, and Mascoma -- and currently available feedstock from agricultural residues, ethanol production could reach three times current levels within three to five years as ethanol from cellulose is added to the current biofuel technology mix," said Erickson.
The authors concluded that these injuries were associated with exposure to aged cellulose acetate dialyzer membranes, which allowed cellulose acetate degradation products to enter the bloodstream.
But to make a strong spun yarn, the cellulose fibers need to be at least 2 centimeters long.
Fortunately, some organisms make compounds called enzymes that can digest, or break down, cellulose.
The process can be sped up through the addition of cellulose, return core sand, decomposition of resin (from core processes) and other sources that support the development of oolitic layers.
The solvents typically used to convert cellulose into a soluble compound--for example, to process wood pulp into rayon--include carbon disulfide and sodium hydroxide, both of which carry substantial health baggage.
The Terram Foundation later released a report comparing the economic advantages of the cellulose industry with those of the wine industry.
Kenji Kamide, Director of Basic Research on Fibre-forming Polymers, Asahi Chemical Industries, Osaka, Japan, discussed the theory of formation of cuprammonium cellulose membranes, and briefly mentioned possible new biomedical applications of these membranes to filter hepatitis and AIDS virus from blood plasma.
The total market for cellulose ether has been analyzed based on the porter's five forces model.