cell inclusion


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Related to cell inclusion: Viral inclusion bodies, nuclear inclusion body

inclusion

 [in-kloo´zhun]
1. the act of enclosing or the condition of being enclosed.
2. anything that is enclosed; a cell inclusion.
cell inclusion a usually lifeless, often temporary, constituent in the cytoplasm of a cell.
fetal inclusion a partially developed embryo enclosed within the body of its twin.

cell inclusion

Etymology: L, cella, storeroom, in + claudere, to shut
any foreign matter or residual elements of the cytoplasm that are enclosed within a cell. They are metabolic products of the cell (for example, granules or crystals). Also called metaplasm.

inclusion

(in-kloo-zhun) [L. inclusus, enclosed]
Being enclosed or included.

inclusion blennorrhea

Chlamydial conjunctivitis.

inclusion body

Microscopic structures (made of a dense, occasionally infective core surrounded by an envelope) seen in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells infected with some intracellular pathogens. Inclusion bodies are seen in cells infected with herpesviruses (esp. cytomegalovirus), smallpox, lymphogranuloma venereum, psittacosis, and other organisms. Synonym: cell inclusion; See: Negri bodies

cell inclusion

Inclusion body.

dental inclusion

An obsolete term for impacted tooth.

fetal inclusion

Malformed twins in which one, the parasite, is completely enclosed within the other, its host or autosite.
See: teratoma

inclusion

1. the act of enclosing or the condition of being enclosed.
2. anything that is enclosed; a cell inclusion.

epithelial inclusion
probably endothelial displacements during embryonic development; epithelial cells in acinar or ductal structure enclosed in a layer of epithelial cells on a basement membrane.
cell inclusion
a usually lifeless, often temporary, constituent in the cytoplasm of a cell.
chlamydial inclusion
see elementary body.
dental inclusion
a tooth so surrounded with bony material that it is unable to erupt.
fetal inclusion
a partially developed embryo enclosed within the body of its twin.
nutritive i's
glycogen inclusions, visible only with electron microscope, include α-particles (rosettes) and β-particles (single particles).