cebocephaly

cebocephaly

 [se″bo-sef´ah-le]
a monkeylike deformity of the head, with the eyes close together and the nose defective.

ce·bo·ceph·a·ly

(sē'bō-sef'ă-lē),
Malformation of the head in which the features are suggestive of a monkey, with defective or absent nose and closely set eyes; part of the holoprosencephaly spectrum.
[G. kēbos, monkey, + kephalē, head]

cebocephaly

An obsolete, nonspecific term for a craniofacial malformation that has morphologic features of a monkey; components of cebocephaly are seen in anencephaly, arrhinencephaly, cyclopia and microcephaly.

cebocephaly

References in periodicals archive ?
We report a case of alobar holoprosencephaly (HPE) and cebocephaly associated with uncontrolled maternal type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus.
2) Cebocephaly represents the combination of hypotelorism and a blind-ended single nostril.
1) We present a new case of alobar HPE with cebocephaly in an infant who was born to a mother with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes mellitus.
The infant was born with alobar HPE and cebocephaly (figure I) to a mother who had uncontrolled type 1 diabetes mellitus.
Alobar HPE with cebocephaly has rarely been reported in live newborns.
To the best of our knowledge, our patient survived longer (9 mo) than any other infant with alobar HPE and cebocephaly whose case has been reported in the literature.
A case of holoprosencephaly and cebocephaly associated to torch infection.
An anatomic comparison of cebocephaly and ethmocephaly.
A 46 chromosome cebocephaly, with remarks on the relation of 13-15 trisomy to holoprosencephaly (arhinencephaly).
Cebocephaly, alobar holoprosencephaly, spina bifida, and sirenomelia in a still birth.
The physical exam found rounded face, sinophris, ocular hypotelorism, cebocephaly, single nostril, and micrognathia (Figure 1).
The physical exam found fused sutures, posterior and anterior fontanelle < 1 cm, rounded face, sinophris, ocular hypotelorism, cebocephaly, single nostril, micrognathia, flat osseous palate, and pectus excavatum (Figure 3).