cavovarus

cavovarus

Talipes cavovarus Orthopedics A type of clubfoot characterized by an overly high longitudinal arch and an inwardly turned heel. See Clubfoot.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cavovarus occurs in S1 level myelomeningocele patients owing to an imbalance between the intrinsic and extrinsic foot muscles.
Orthopaedic problems for each neurological level Level % Deformity Thoracic (paraplegic) 23 Scoliosis Kyphosis Equinus Mid-lumbar (L3,4) 30 Hip dislocation Internal and external tibial torsion Clubfoot Congenital vertical talus Ankle and hindfoot valgus Low lumbar/calcaneus (L5) 17 Calcaneus Ankle valgus Hindfoot valgus Sacral/'normal' (S1) 30 Cavovarus foot
International Federation of Foot and Ankle Societies (IFFAS) Award for the best international paper: Ankle Joint Pressure Changes in a Pes Cavovarus Model: Supramalleolar Valgus Osteotomy Versus Lateralizing Calcaneal Osteotomy.
A subset of patients, however, are subject to increased failure rates, including those with long-standing instability, poor tissue quality, history of previous repair, generalized ligamentous laxity, and cavovarus foot deformity.
Risk factors for failure and recurrent instability after operative procedure are ligamentous laxity, longstanding instability, high functional demand, and a cavovarus foot.
Cavovarus and calcaneocavus foot deformities have also been reported (Bigos & Coleman, 1984).
18] Deformities, including equinus, club foot, valgus and cavovarus, can be corrected by a range of operations.
This five year study looked at the effect varying levels of ankle arthritis had on the clinical outcomes of 22 patients who had undergone lateral ankle ligament reconstruction and corrective osteotomy for cavovarus deformity.