causation


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causation

[kôsā′shən]
Etymology: L, causa
(in law) the existence of a reasonable connection between the misfeasance, malfeasance, or nonfeasance of the defendant and the injury or damage suffered by the plaintiff. In a lawsuit in which negligence is alleged, the harm suffered by the plaintiff must be proved to result directly from the negligence of the defendant; causation must be demonstrated.

causation

Cause & effect Law & medicine 1. In the context of disability evaluation, where a particular condition might be linked to the workplace; medical definition of causation requires valid scientific proof; legal definition requires either a probability of > 50% or that the event was more likely than not to be causative. See Pulmonary function test Malpractice The establishment of a cause-and-effect relationship between an allegedly negligent act and the purported injuries. See Malpractice, Negligence.

causation,

n the act or agency which produces an effect. See also acausal.

causation

the relation of cause to effect.

causation analysis
comparison of the rate of occurrence of the disease in animals which were exposed to the suspected agent to the occurrence rate in animals which were not so exposed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The court granted in part and denied in part the Williams' Petition for extraordinary writ relief and directed the clerk of the court to issue a writ of mandamus instructing the lower court to set aside that portion of its order allowing Nurse Hambrick to testify as to medical causation.
that causation is a coverage question when an insurer wholly denies that there is a covered loss; but when the insurer admits there is coverage, it becomes an amount-of-loss issue for the appraisal panel.
Moreover, the rules expressly permit rebutting causation when such a presumption arises in other contexts.
We can make the following observations about recent cases from the United Kingdom that examine the role of epidemiological evidence in assessing causation in medicinal product liability claims.
s contention that 'in addition to the lack of unlawfulness, neither intent nor causation applies' does not hold in terms of the law.
Tse believes that the problem of mental causation and the problem of free will are intimately related.
Anti-concurrent causation permits denial of a claim when one of a multiple number of perils, occurring simultaneously, is excluded under the policy.
The Seventh Circuit's disregard of this principle and its extraordinary retroactive imposition of liability without proof of causation for lawful conduct dating back to the first half of the 1900s cannot survive constitutional scrutiny.
But he takes issue with Davidson's assumption that the notion of causation at stake in rational explanations has to be the same as the one used by the physical sciences (which Marcus calls "efficient causation").
Across the country, insurers sought to protect themselves from a repeat of the massive losses they had incurred in the wake of the 1906 San Francisco catastrophe by inserting so-called "anti-concurrent causation clauses" into nearly all of their property insurance policies.