cauda equina


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Related to cauda equina: Cauda equina syndrome

cauda

 [kaw´da] (pl. cau´dae) (L.)
a tail or tail-like appendage.
cauda equi´na the collection of spinal roots descending from the lower spinal cord and occupying the vertebral canal below the cord.
 Cauda equina, descending from the conus medullaris of the spinal cord. From Dorland's, 2000.

cau·da e·qui·na

[TA]
the bundle of spinal nerve roots arising from the lumbosacral enlargement and medullary cone and running through the lumbar cistern (subarachnoid space) within the vertebral canal below the first lumbar vertebra; it comprises the roots of all the spinal nerves below the first lumbar.
[L. horse tail]

cauda equina

Etymology: L, cauda + equus, horse
the lower end of the spinal cord at the first lumbar vertebra and the bundle of lumbar, sacral, and coccygeal nerve roots that emerge from the spinal cord at the first lumbar vertebra and descend through the spinal canal of the sacrum and coccyx before reaching the intervertebral foramina of their particular vertebrae. The cauda equina resembles a horse's tail.

cau·da e·qui·na

(kaw'dă ē-kwī'nă) [TA]
The bundle of spinal nerve roots arising from the lumbosacral enlargement and medullary cone and running through the lumbar cistern (subarachnoid space) within the vertebral canal below the first lumbar vertebra; it comprises the roots of all the spinal nerves below the first lumbar.
[L. horse tail]

cauda equina

The leash of spinal nerves hanging down in the spinal canal below the termination of the SPINAL CORD, at about the level of the first lumbar vertebra.

Cauda equina

The roots of the spinal nerves controlling movement and sensation in the legs. These nerve roots are located in the lower spine and resemble a horse's tail (cauda equina in Latin).
Mentioned in: Low Back Pain

cauda equina

bundle of paired spinal nerve roots extending from the distal tip of the spinal cord and traversing the subarachnoid space within the vertebral canal; begins at level of first lumbar vertebra (L1)

cauda

pl. caudae [L.] a tail or tail-like appendage.

cauda equina
the collection of spinal roots that stream caudally from the end of the spinal cord and occupy the vertebral canal.
cauda equina compression
see lumbosacral stenosis.
cauda equina syndrome
cauda helicis
caudal process of the helix of the ear of the dog.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although neurological complications have been observed with different local anaesthetics, lignocaine causes the highest incidence of transient neurological symptoms and possibly, cauda equina syndrome.
4,5,20) Lower extremity weakness, paraplegia, sensory deficits, altered deep tendon reflexes, sphincteric dysfunction and cauda equina syndrome are frequently seen in the course of the disease; (5,17) atypical clinical presentations, such as palpable cysts in the soft tissues on either side of the vertebral column, are not seldom encountered.
Cauda equina syndrome is caused by any large space-occupying mass, such as a large central HNP, located in the spinal canal at the level of the cauda equina.
3] Isolated spinal cord cauda equina involvement is very rare.
Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the cauda equina in adults with no detectable primary intracranial neoplasm--three case studies.
Richard Quinn had a treble here on Wednesday and he can do well again with a first and last race double on Lightning Arrow and Cauda Equina.
Adverse Reactions- The most common adverse drug reactions ([greater than or equal to] 5%) reported in patients receiving XTANDI in the randomized clinical trial were asthenia/fatigue, back pain, diarrhea, arthralgia, hot flush, peripheral edema, musculoskeletal pain, headache, upper respiratory infection, muscular weakness, dizziness, insomnia, lower respiratory infection, spinal cord compression and cauda equina syndrome, hematuria, paresthesia, anxiety, and hypertension.
Patients should be specifically questioned with regard to loss of sphincter function suggesting cauda equina involvement.
Serious complications such as nerve root injury, cauda equina syndrome, discitis and spinal instability have been reported but are rare (9).
We describe ARL in an HIV-positive patient without history of AIDS-defining disease presenting as cauda equina syndrome.
Large lesions may present as neurogenic claudication or sphincter dysfunction, such as seen in cauda equina syndrome.