cathexis

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cathexis

 [kah-thek´sis]
in psychiatry, conscious or unconscious investment of psychic energy in a person, idea, or any other object. adj., adj cathec´tic.

ca·thex·is

(kă-thek'sis),
A conscious or unconscious attachment of psychic energy to an idea, object, or person.
[G. kathexis, a holding in, retention]

cathexis

/ca·thex·is/ (kah-thek´sis) conscious or unconscious investment of psychic energy in a person, idea, or any other object.cathec´tic

cathexis

[kəthek′sis]
Etymology: Gk, kathexis, retention
the conscious or unconscious attachment of emotional feeling and importance to a specific idea, person, or object. cathectic, adj.

ca·thex·is

(kă-thek'sis)
A conscious or unconscious attachment of psychic energy to an idea, object, or person.
[G. kathexis, a holding in, retention]

cathexis

A Freudian concept in which ‘emotional energy’ is said to be concentrated on, or attached to, an idea, person or object, in much the way, according to Freud, that an electric charge can be retained on insulating material. The investment of ‘libidinal’ energy in something. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.
References in periodicals archive ?
That is, * it will be less affirmative of gay identity, which it frequently merely tolerates as a strategic and historical contingency, than of intense cathexes on sexual practices and affective states like desire, abjection, vigor, etc.
The initiate is being purged of his mother's influence and, in Joseph Campbell's words, "all inappropriate infantile cathexes.
He turns his emotional cathexes into persons, he peoples the world with them and meets his internal mental processes again outside himself in just the same way as that intelligent paranoiac, Schreber, found a reflection of the attachments and detachments of his libido in the vicissitudes of his confabulated rays of God.
But acknowledging that Hitler was a lost source of positive feelings, the Mitscherlichs argued, would have compromised Germans' "intense defense against guilt, shame, and anxiety, a defense which was achieved by the withdrawal of previously powerful libidinal cathexes.