catheter-related bloodstream infection


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catheter-related bloodstream infection

An infection caused by a bacterium or fungus that enters the blood via a device inserted into it. Staphylococcus aureus, Candida species, Enterococci, and Pseudomonas species are common causes of bacteremia and sepsis in patients with invasive catheters.
References in periodicals archive ?
Risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection with peripherally inserted central venous catheters used in hospitalized patients.
Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) occur at an average rate of 5 per 1,000 catheter days in intensive-care units in the United States (1), resulting in 80,000 episodes of CR-BSI per year (2).
Catheters impregnated with chlorhexidine and antimicrobial agents can reduce the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections.
Numerous studies regarding the efficacy of the InVision-Plus Needleless IV Connector have been published in the last six years-which is particularly important in light of the growing incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI).
Some of the nontechnologic interventions aimed at reducing the risk for catheter-related bloodstream infection, such as quality improvement programs, depend on changes in human behavior.
She noted a recent FDA Alert & Notification letter which requires manufacturers of positive displacement IV connectors to prove their devices do not increase catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) risk.
As part of the 1,000 Lives Plus programme, improvements have been made in reducing the rate of catheter-related bloodstream infections by introducing two new care bundles and ensuring hospitals are committed to using them.
Impact of a prevention strategy targeting hand hygiene and catheter care on the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections.
based Cook Medical's Spectrum catheters include the antibiotics minocycline and rifampin and meet the newly released 1A recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for reducing catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) if maximal sterile barrier precautions haven't helped a facility reach its [infection prevention] goal.
This is particularly important because of patient-safety guidelines to help prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections that necessitate new disinfecting techniques to prevent them, including rigorous cleaning of IV line components with IPA.