cathect


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cathect

(kə-thĕkt′, kă-)
tr.v. ca·thected, ca·thecting, ca·thects
To invest emotional energy in (a person, object, or idea).

ca·thec′tic adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this sense--adequacy figured as stasis itself, and thus toxic to thought--maybe we can understand why it might be reasonable for Ward to later remind himself that "things don't cathect," which I read as a kind of precautionary ballast; he is always teetering toward this conclusion, especially in his next book, The Crisis of Infinite Worlds.
While these organizations harness the anger or disaffection that the Tea Party cathects, they distribute the sensible against the government and promote austerity to enable their own free market possibilities.
Getting the basket, scoring the point, winning the game: We as spectators cathect so much to repeated performances of this particular net swoosh, yet Pfeiffer's film deflates it to a simple, breezelike movement of some woven nylon cords.
I have suggested that one attraction of the credulous reader to Booth may be that the narrative audience can be used to cordon off the area of readerly experience in which we cathect with the fiction most forcefully and find ourselves most dramatically at its mercy.
Ivan Costello's presence in the dream is a clear instance of the "day's residue," an arbitrary sign with which unconscious wishes cathect in order to find some form of expression.
Ascetics seem to me prone to cathect images of development rather than visions of masculinity or femininity.
Then there are those who have been obligated to cathect the state of the other," she writes.
The latter remains constant in spite of the different ways in which we cathect objects.
Thus, Rosenblatt's film's wager is not the obvious and banal one that we can truly understand Hitler, Stalin, Mao, Mussolini, and Franco only if we first grasp them as "humans"--as individuals with unique dispositions of libidinal energy, who cathect a specific array of objects in particular ways--but precisely the opposite: we understand nothing if we try to force their quotidian lives to correspond or correlate with their social existence.
Kristeva recommends that a melancholic woman locate a partner who can lead her to cathect "her autoeroticism in a jouissance of the other (separate, symbolic, phallic)" (Kristeva 1989, 78).
Just who is this enigmatic woman ensconced at the center of Faulkner's tragedy; One son, Darl, calls her "Addie Bundren," this formality a symptom of his early inability to cathect with his mother, an inability which has left him vulnerable to psychosis.
If only one could cathect [investir] that single spectator body that remains, encircle it more and more tightly in order to forget the defeat