catecholamine


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Related to catecholamine: serotonin

catecholamine

 [kat″ĕ-kol´ah-mēn″]
any of a group of sympathomimetic amines (including dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine), the aromatic portion of whose molecule is catechol.

The catecholamines play an important role in the body's physiological response to stress. Their release at sympathetic nerve endings increases the rate and force of muscular contraction of the heart, thereby increasing cardiac output; constricts peripheral blood vessels, resulting in elevated blood pressure; elevates blood glucose levels by hepatic and skeletal muscle glycogenolysis; and promotes an increase in blood lipids by increasing the catabolism of fats.

catecholamine

/cat·e·chol·amine/ (kat″ah-kol´ah-mēn″) any of a group of sympathomimetic amines (including dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine), the aromatic portion of whose molecule is catechol.

catecholamine

(kăt′ĭ-kō′lə-mēn′, -kô′-)
n.
Any of a group of monoamines, including epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine, that act as neurotransmitters and hormones.

catecholamine

[kat′əkəlam′in]
any one of a group of sympathomimetic compounds composed of a catechol (1,2-dihydroxyphenyl) moiety carrying an alkyl side chain with an amine group on the side chain. Some catecholamines are produced naturally by the body and function as key neurological chemicals.

catecholamine

Endocrinology A biogenic amine from tyramine/phenylalanine which contains a catechol nucleus Examples Epinephrine–adrenaline in UK, norepinephrine–noradrenaline and dopamine, which act as hormones and neurotransmitter in the peripheral and central nervous system; catecholamines are produced by sympathetic nervous system activation Activity Autonomic arousal, fight-or-flight stress response, reward response. See Biogenic amine, Dopamine, Epinephrine, Indolamine, Norepinephrine.

catecholamine

any CATECHOL-derived compound such as adrenalin or dopamine, which exert a neurotransmitting action similar to that of the sympathetic nervous system (see AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM).

catecholamine (kat´əkō´ləmēn´),

n any one of a group of sympathomimetic compounds composed of a catechol molecule and the aliphatic portion of amine. Some catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine) are produced naturally by the body and function as key neurologic chemicals.

catecholamine

any of a group of sympathomimetic amines (including dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine), the aromatic portion of whose molecule is catechol.
The catecholamines play an important role in the body's physiological response to stress. Their release at sympathetic nerve endings increases the rate and force of muscular contraction of the heart, thereby increasing cardiac output; constricts peripheral blood vessels, resulting in elevated blood pressure; elevates blood glucose levels by hepatic and skeletal muscle glycogenolysis; and promotes an increase in blood lipids by increasing the catabolism of fats.

catecholamine-depleting agents
cause depletion of neuronal stores of norepinephrine, thereby reducing adrenergic responses, e.g. reserpine.
References in periodicals archive ?
It should be noted that these tumors produce catecholamines that are metabolized inside the tumor into free metanephrines, which are continuously released from the tumor tissue into the circulation.
1) Catecholamines can also cause irreversible damage to the intima and vasa vasorum, and increased levels can compromise myocardial oxygen supply and demand, thus predisposing one to coronary artery disease (1) and MI.
4] Preoperative diagnosis and management are necessary to avoid catecholamine crises.
The major catecholamines secreted by pheochromocytomas are epinephrine and norepinephrine, although some tumors contain and secrete large amounts of dopamine.
Surges in catecholamine release may result in fatal hypertensive crises.
Other blood tests, including complete blood count and catecholamine and urinary catecholamine values, were normal.
Percutaneous biopsy of adrenal and extra-adrenal retroperitoneal lesions: Beware of catecholamine secreting tumours
The most common reasons for biochemical testing are: (a) presence of both hypertension and episodic symptoms of catecholamine excess (e.
He added that a potential mechanism to explain the increased risk of coronary events associated with decreasing temperature is the stimulation of cold receptors in the skin and therefore the sympathetic nervous system, leading to a rise in catecholamine levels.
Some have explored the relationship between catecholamine levels and their role in the onset of the takotsubo cardiomyopathy.
Although head and neck paragangliomas are less likely to be functional, up to 4% have been shown to be functional, and therefore it is recommended that these patients are screened for catecholamine excess (3).
Among the many differentially expressed genes were several related to catecholamine, glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling, and the researchers zeroed in on these because they are involved in regulating novelty-seeking and responding to reward in vertebrates.