catchment area

(redirected from catchment areas)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

area

 [a´re-ah] (pl. a´reae, areas) (L.)
a limited space or plane surface.
acoustic a's auditory areas.
association a's areas of the cerebral cortex (excluding primary areas) connected with each other and with the neothalamus; they are responsible for higher mental and emotional processes, including memory, learning, speech, and the interpretation of sensations.
Area. Functional areas and lobes of the cerebrum.
auditory a's two contiguous areas of the temporal lobe in the region of the anterior transverse temporal gyrus, known as the primary and secondary auditory areas. Called also acoustic areas.
Broca's motor speech area an area comprising parts of the opercular and triangular portions of the inferior frontal gyrus; injury to this area may result in motor aphasia.
Broca's parolfactory area a small area of cortex on the medial surface of each cerebral hemisphere, between the anterior and posterior parolfactory sulci. Called also area subcallosa.
Brodmann's a's specific occipital and preoccipital areas of the cerebral cortex, distinguished by differences in the arrangement of their six cellular layers, and identified by numbering each area. They are considered to be the seat of specific functions of the brain.
catchment area
1. the geographical region drained by one body of water.
2. the area whose residents are served by a specialized health care agency. Called also catchment.
contact area proximal surface.
embryonic area (germinal area) (area germinati´va) embryonic disk.
Kiesselbach's area an area on the anterior part of the nasal septum, richly supplied with capillaries, and a common site of epistaxis (nosebleed).
language area any nerve center of the cerebral cortex, usually in the dominant hemisphere, controlling the understanding or use of language.
motor area any area of the cerebral cortex primarily involved in stimulating muscle contractions; most are in the precentral gyri. See also premotor area, sensorimotor area, and Broca's motor speech area.
motor speech area see Broca's motor speech area and Wernicke's area.
occupational performance a's categories of activities that make up an individual's occupational performance; they include activities of daily living, work activities, and play or leisure activities. A delay in any of these areas may be addressed by occupational therapy intervention.
olfactory area
1. a general area of the brain, including the olfactory bulb, tract, and trigone, the anterior portion of the gyrus cinguli, and the uncus.
postcentral area (postrolandic area) an area just posterior to the central sulcus of the cerebral hemisphere that is the primary receiving area for general sensations.
precentral area primary somatomotor area.
premotor area an area of the motor cortex of the frontal lobe immediately in front of the precentral gyrus.
primary area areas of the cerebral cortex comprising the motor and sensory regions.
primary receiving a's the areas of the cerebral cortex that receive the thalamic projections of the primary sensory modalities such as vision, hearing, and smell. Called also sensory areas.
primary somatomotor area an area in the posterior part of the frontal lobe just anterior to the central sulcus; different regions control motor activity of specific parts of the body. Called also precentral area and rolandic area.
projection a's those areas of the cerebral cortex that receive the most direct projection of the sensory systems of the body.
sensorimotor area the cortex of the precentral and postcentral gyri, which are the motor area and the primary receiving area for general sensations, respectively.
sensory a's primary receiving areas.
sensory association area an association area around the borders of a primary receiving area, where sensory stimuli are interpreted.
silent area an area of the brain in which pathologic conditions may occur without producing symptoms.
somatic sensory area (somatosensory area) either of two cortical projection areas in or near the postcentral gyrus where conscious perception of somatic sensations occurs, known as the first or primary somatosensory area and the second or secondary somatosensory area.
area subcallo´sa (subcallosal area) Broca's parolfactory area.
area under the curve (AUC) the area enclosed between the curve of a probability with nonnegative values and the axis of the quality being measured; of the total area under a curve, the proportion that falls between two given points on the curve defines a probability density function.
visual a's three areas (first, second, and third visual areas) of the visual cortex. The first visual area is better known as the striate cortex.
vocal area rima glottidis.
Wernicke's area originally a name for a speech center thought to be confined to the posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus next to the transverse temporal gyri; the term now refers to a wider zone that also includes the supramarginal and angular gyri.

catch·ment ar·e·a

the geographic jurisdiction of a community mental health center; its boundaries delimit the population of people who qualify for mental health services provided by that particular center.

catchment area

n.
1. The area drained by a river or body of water. Also called catchment basin.
2. The surrounding area served by an institution, such as a hospital or school.

catchment area

Etymology: L, capere, to take, area, space
the specific geographic area for which a particular institution, especially a mental health center, is responsible.

catchment area

Medtalk A region served by a health care facility or health plan, and delineated by population distribution, geography, or transportation patterns. See Demographics.

catch·ment ar·ea

(kachmĕnt ārē-ă)
Geographic jurisdiction of a community mental health center; its boundaries delimit the population of people who qualify for mental health services provided by that particular center.

catchment area

the region from which the data in a particular study are drawn.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sophie White, Manager at Peter Alan estate agents in Whitchurch, Cardiff, said: "We see a lot of movement in a certain catchment areas, especially for comprehensive schools like Whitchurch High, Cardiff High and Radyr Comprehensive.
It was the secondary school with the second smallest catchment area - with only those living within 0.
I'm calling upon all residents to be vigilant and report anybody who destroys the water catchment areas," Situma added.
Officials have launched a public consultation on revising catchment area arrangements from September 2015 as part of its continual review of the supply of and demand for school places.
Paul Kehoe, airport chief executive, in response to report Great Airports For Great Cities, claimed Birmingham had the second largest business catchment area of any long-haul airport that specialised in manufacturing.
This maddening rush to sign established or promising domestic players has hit the IPL catchment area rule for a six, with one prominent team official describing the stipulation as a " mere tokenism".
Providers of secondary care services ("providers") are being split from their fund-holders ("commissioners"), and both providers and commissioners need to assess aspects of their services that depend on definition of catchment areas.
This report recommended that catchment areas or feeder primary schools are considered.
But if you have schools with catchment areas I expect they [house prices] will be affected.
Therefore the great debate of national competition issues can be bypassed and the battleground fought in the micro economics of individual catchment areas.
whereas the mining areas are practically always covered with the territory of catchment areas [3, 4].
David Pickup, who runs the Pickups estate agency at Yarm, said: "We find some buyers only look for property in the catchment areas of certain schools and in the Yarm, Eaglescliffe and Egglescliffe areas, we have some top schools.