catastrophic care

catastrophic care

[kat′əstrof′ik]
Etymology: Gk, katastrophe, sudden downturn; L, garrire, to babble
a pattern of health care that involves intensive, highly specialized life-support care of an acutely ill or severely traumatized patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the patient's perspective, under the Affordable Care Act rules, individual major medical policies provide what amounts to unlimited catastrophic care.
Offering a lower price, no frills, catastrophic care option might be more appealing to young people who still see themselves as invincible.
Generally thought of in terms of catastrophic care, decision-making authority must be already agreed upon so that if someone has an acute episode in the middle of the night, all of the questions about what happens to this patient have been worked out.
It is necessary to protect older people against catastrophic care costs.
The family hadn't planned for the catastrophic care that the disease requires and Gunvalson, owner of Coto Insurance & Financial Services, has dedicated her insurance career to helping clients make plans for the unexpected through safe money choices.
Parnell points out options that are available to many people, such as insuring one's self only for catastrophic care (and how to find an insurer to help with that), then using cash-only doctors, primary care facilities, or pharmacies for other routine needs.
Sun Life itself doesn't address that topic of the total cost of catastrophic care in a recent report on catastrophic stop-loss claims paid since 2010.
For instance, the association said, a recent CMS study within the Medicare Part D program found that medication therapy management (MTM) can lead to improved drug therapy outcomes and significantly reduce catastrophic care and emergency room costs.
In Catastrophic Care, Goldhill shows the US health care sector is not worth preserving in anything like its current form -- and President Obama's health care law is likely to exacerbate its failings.
People are left exposed to potentially catastrophic care costs with no way to protect themselves.
uk us at "We can meet that by having a trade-off between those currently receiving the winter fuel allowance and not receiving it in the future but actually that being targeted on the poorest and the savings being used to ensure the frail, those who have dementia, those that are disabled, can have the peace of mind of knowing they don't face those catastrophic care costs.
Their retirement and invested assets are being used to fund their current lifestyle, and there will not be enough left to continue doing so after paying for catastrophic care.
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