cataphora

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cataphora

A term that has been retired from the working medical parlance, defined as a clouded or semicomatose mental state punctuated by periods of partial consciousness.

ca·taph·o·ra

(kă-taf'ŏr-ă)
Semicoma or somnolence interrupted by intervals of partial consciousness.
[G. a falling down]

cataphora

lethargy with intervals of imperfect waking.
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2(g) and cataphorically conveying it to the assertion in 3.
All clause types (nominal, adjectival, and adverbial) can anaphorically make reference to an antecedent or cataphorically introduce or anticipate a referent (either entity or proposition).
A comment modifier and a marker of identification may occur in the same noun phrase, but in such a case the marker is either functioning anaphorically, or is functioning cataphorically but with the identification furnished by another modifier in the noun phrase.
Since he is unlikely to relate cataphorically to dryhten, it must relate anaphorically to a preceding masculine singular noun.
As a third point of parallelism with pronouns, they can also refer cataphorically to a clause here:
Certainly, this sort of definition is not so common in everyday language, but it must be taken into account that this is a magazine article and in the language of the press, headlines are typically interpreted cataphorically (White et al.
After some tension has progressively built up by delaying the informative focus, the vehement admonition towards his mistress in line 12, "Thou shallt not Love by meanes so dangerous," acts as a plosive release and cataphorically introduces the main theme by means of a declarative act: "Be my trew Mistres still, not my faignd Page" (l.
The parallel construction "ceilings have eyes" is cataphorically pointing forward to walls have ears, providing a cohesive tie (16).
In an act of public showing, she is elevated to a central position, which offers the possibility of reading cataphorically, considering the scene a glimpse of the future scene of recognition that sheds light on the past that precedes her pastoral elevation.
Coming back to Chaucer, an argument favouring the conjunction interpretation is that out of 64 instances of the al + Verb + Pronoun sequence m the prose, in 49 we invariably find the expression al be it so that S (analogous to though so be that Slif so be that S commonly found in Chaucer) and in four al be it that S, without what Nagucka (1968: 79) calls the factive pronominal so, which cataphorically refers to the that-clause.