catalepsy

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catalepsy

 [kat´ah-lep″se]
a condition of diminished responsiveness usually characterized by a trancelike state and constantly maintained immobility, often with cerea flexibilitas. Affected individuals may remain in one position for minutes, days, or even longer. adj., adj catalep´tic.

Catalepsy may accompany any of several different mental illnesses. It is common in catatonic schizophrenia and may also occur in epilepsy, hysteria, and cerebellar disorders; it may also be induced by hypnosis. The patient may sit with the hands flat on the knees and the head bowed or may remain in an awkward and uncomfortable position. The patient is not necessarily unaware of what is going on but does not respond. This apathetic condition may end as suddenly as it begins.
Patient Care. Regular skin care and exercise of the muscles and joints are necessary to prevent circulatory complications. Nutritional status requires attention and an adequate diet must be provided. Even though cataleptic patients may not be able to respond to spoken directions or conversation and are physically unable to move, they cannot be left in one position for long periods of time any more than can patients who are physically paralyzed. The mental state of these patients is such that they cannot recognize numbness or pain, nor can they communicate a need for attention.

Care must be used in conversations held within the patient's hearing. Total apathy does not indicate a loss of ability to hear or see what is going on. Sometimes it is of great help to these patients to have someone sit quietly beside them so that they are aware that someone cares and is genuinely interested in their welfare.

A sudden change in the patient's condition, with increased activity, may indicate progression from one state of extreme emotion to another. Restlessness or talkativeness usually do not indicate a dramatic improvement in mental condition. When the patient becomes more active the staff should be alert to the possibility of suicide and attempts at self-mutilation. A person who has exhibited symptoms as severe as catalepsy is very ill and will need continued and long-term care to facilitate recovery from serious emotional problems.

cat·a·lep·sy

(kat'ă-lep'sē),
A condition characterized by waxy rigidity of the limbs, which may be placed in various positions that are maintained for a time, lack of response to stimuli, mutism, and inactivity; occurs with some psychoses, especially catatonic schizophrenia.
[G. katalēpsis, a seizing, catalepsy, fr. kata, down, + lēpsis, a seizure]

catalepsy

/cat·a·lep·sy/ (-lep″se) indefinitely prolonged maintenance of a fixed body posture; seen in severe cases of catatonic schizophrenia. The term is sometimes used to denote cerea flexibilitas.

catalepsy

(kăt′l-ĕp′sē)
n. pl. catalep·sies
A condition characterized by lack of response to external stimuli and by muscular rigidity, so that the limbs remain where they are positioned. It occurs in a variety of physical and psychological disorders, such as epilepsy and schizophrenia, and can be induced by hypnosis.

cat′a·lep′tic (kăt′l-ĕp′tĭk) adj.
cat′a·lep′ti·cal·ly adv.

catalepsy

[kat′əlep′sē]
Etymology: Gk, kata + lambanein, to seize
an abnormal state characterized by a trancelike level of consciousness and postural rigidity. It occurs in hypnosis and in certain organic and psychological disorders such as schizophrenia, epilepsy, and hysteria. cataleptic, adj.
The rigid maintenance of a body position over an extended period of time; a state of decreased responsiveness accompanied by a trancelike state, as seen in organic or psychologic disorders or under hypnosis

catalepsy

Psychiatry A state of ↓ responsiveness with a trancelike states, which occurs in organic or psychologic disorders, or under hypnosis

cat·a·lep·sy

(kat'ă-lep-sē)
A morbid condition characterized by waxy rigidity of the limbs, lack of response to stimuli, mutism, and inactivity; occurs with some psychoses, especially catatonic schizophrenia.
[G. katalēpsis, a seizing, catalepsy, fr. kata, down, + lēpsis, a seizure]

catalepsy

Muscle rigidity, lack of awareness and the abnormal maintenance, often for long periods, of sometimes bizarre postures or attitudes. This was once a common feature of SCHIZOPHRENIA but seems to have become rare in recent years.

catalepsy

a seizure of the body, sometimes with loss of consciousness. The reaction can be a behavioural defence reaction.

catalepsy,

n stiffening of the body or more commonly a specific body part, such as a limb, which can be induced by hypnosis.

catalepsy

a condition of diminished responsiveness usually characterized by a trancelike state and constantly maintained immobility, often with flexibilitas cerea (a waxy rigidity of muscles). In humans, the patient with catalepsy may remain in one position for minutes, days, or even longer.
References in periodicals archive ?
I will consider two sorts of deep absorption, both of which were sometimes given cataleptic shadings: the oblivion ascribed to thinkers lost in thought, and the stupor attributed to less productive passions like deep chagrin.
The upsurge in French-vernacular works containing case histories of cataleptic patients began around 1709, when the Paris surgeon Pierre Dionis published a dissertation that included the case of Elisabeth Devigne, whose cataleptic fits had all of Paris buzzing with rumors that she was either possessed, overcome with religious enthusiasm, or faking it.
20) Hecquet's intent was to "naturalize" the contagious, sometimes cataleptic convulsions which people like Charlotte de la Porte attributed to divine inspiration.
Attalin, a medical professor in Besancon, about a cataleptic lady from Vesoul whose attacks were triggered by a lawsuit of great personal consequence (TC, 11-17).
Most were tied to reflections on the vagaries of reason and consciousness: these included his observation (cited earlier) on the fleeting quality of conscious reason in "deep thinkers" (EP 328-29); an allusion to the fabled fifty-year sleep of Epimenides, which he evoked while raising the question "In the cataleptic in which the animal [body] is reduced to the purely sensitive state, what happens to the so-called commerce between body and soul?
Suzanne's cataleptic quality become even more pronounced as her profession approaches and she sinks deeper into dejection and dread for the existence that awaits her.