casual contact


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casual contact

Relations between people without the sharing of blood or body fluids, such as playing games together, using the same shower, sharing meals, or living in close proximity.
See also: contact
References in periodicals archive ?
Misconception was observed in our study regarding casual contacts, sneezing coughing and sharing utensils.
They cannot transmit the infection with casual contact like shaking hands and we must all play our part in fighting the parallel social stigmatization and discrimination against people with these infections so that there are no obstacles in the support they need in an effort to educate about, prevent and treat this huge epidemic, Dr.
Jean-Louis Bruguiere, formerly the top Paris-based investigative magistrate handling terrorism-related cases, told Reuters no French or European intelligence or security agency had any trace on the suspect and no evidence has surfaced to connect him to any militant group or other suspects or even to casual contact with militant literature or propaganda.
For this reason, FeLV is easily transmitted among susceptible cats by casual contact.
Israel had evolved from a country that sent people to jail for casual contact with the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) to one negotiating on what parts of the West Bank it would cede to the PLO and when.
However, a proportion of women reported that the disease is transmitted by kissing (40 per cent), casual contact, such as hugging and handshakes (26.
It is passed on through bodily fluids and not through casual contact.
CMV is spread through bodily fluids and the chance of getting a CMV infection from casual contact is very small.
The virus is not transmitted through casual contact, and patients are not believed to be infectious before the onset of symptoms.
But legal experts said there are differences here that could work in Hickox's favor in court: People infected with Ebola are not contagious until they have symptoms, and the virus is not spread through casual contact.
It is not necessary or appropriate to administer antibiotics to those who have had casual contact with someone with meningitis - for example, those who live in the same accommodation building - unless they have had prolonged close contact with the person concerned.