castrate

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castrate

 [kas´trāt]
1. to deprive of the gonads, rendering the individual incapable of reproduction.
2. a castrated individual.

cas·trate

(kas'trāt),
To remove the testicles or the ovaries.
[L. castro, pp. -atus, to deprive of generative power (male or female)]

castrate

/cas·trate/ (kas´trāt)
1. to deprive of the gonads, rendering the individual incapable of reproduction.
2. a castrated individual.

castrate

(kăs′trāt′)
tr.v. cas·trated, cas·trating, cas·trates
1. To remove the testicles of (a male); geld or emasculate.
2. To remove the ovaries of (a female); spay.
n.
An individual who is incapable of reproduction as a result of removal, destruction, or inactivation of the gonads.

cas′trat·er, cas′tra·tor n.
cas·tra′tion n.

castrate

verb To surgically remove the testes to make a human or animal male inconceivable.

cas·trate

(kas'trāt)
To remove the testicles or the ovaries.
[L. castro, pp. -atus, to deprive of generative power (male or female)]

castrate

1. to deprive of the gonads, rendering the animal incapable of reproduction.
2. a castrated animal.
The strictly correct usage of the word is to apply it to animals of both sexes. Common usage is to restrict its use to the male.
References in periodicals archive ?
She emphasizes that her goal is not to merely offer an "explanation of the phenomenon" of the castrato from 1550 to 1922.
Accordingly, when a female opera singer en travesti stepped onto the stage to sing in the early nineteenth century, listeners experienced the haunting aural memory of the castrato, initiating a circular renegotiation of both the visual image of the performer and the sound of the voice.
The last such "church" castrato was Alessandro Moreschi, who "joined the choir of the Sistine Chapel as a soloist in 1883 .
The practice, in part a reaction to Catholicism's traditional ban on females singing in church, began in the sixteenth century and reached its peak in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Italian opera, in which the male heroic lead would usually be written for a castrato singer.
Natalie sang like an angel during her rendition of Mozart's challenging Exsultate, Jubilate, which the composer wrote for famed castrato Venanzio Rauzzini.
have benefited the castrato but, more importantly, the family that
I felt that it was especially important after the surprise success of The Hours not to write that book again, like some literary castrato who sings the same song to the delight of the court.
Even they surpassed themselves with Crazy For You - The Castrato Mix.
77, 10 Berlin (Schoeneberg) Phone: (49) 30 211 66 42 Traditional family-owned restaurant offers mouth-watering dishes like castrato alla pastorale and caponata.
What was happening socially that the high voice of the castrato fell out of favor with opera audiences and composers?
There is much that appeals in Southern Baroque Art (1924), such as his account of the singing of the celebrated castrato Farinelli, who soothed the melancholy of Philip v in his palace at Aranjuez.
His equally tragic, yet ultimately triumphant son Idamante - a role originally written for a castrato - was perhaps slightly less convincing.