castration anxiety


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Related to castration anxiety: castration complex, Electra complex

cas·tra·tion com·plex

1. a child's fear of injury to the genitals by the parent of the same gender as punishment for unconcious guilt over oedipal feelings;
2. fantasized loss of the penis by a female or fear of its actual loss by a male;
3. unconscious fear of injury from those in authority.
Synonym(s): castration anxiety

castration anxiety

1 the fantasized fear of injury or loss of the genital organs, often as the reaction to a repressed feeling of punishment for forbidden sexual desires. It may also be caused by some apparently threatening everyday occurrence, such as a humiliating experience, loss of a job, or loss of authority.
2 a general threat to the masculinity or femininity of a person or an unrealistic fear of bodily injury or loss of power. Also called anxiety complex. See also anxiety disorder. Compare penis envy.
Anxiety due to perceived/fantasised danger or fear of injury to the genitalia and/or body, precipitated by everyday events with symbolic significance which appear threatening, such as loss of a job, loss of a tooth, or experiencing ridicule or humiliation

castration anxiety

Psychiatry Anxiety due to fantasized danger or injuries to the genitals and/or body, precipitated by everyday events with symbolic significance which appear threatening, such as loss of a job, loss of a tooth, or an experience of ridicule or humiliation

castration anxiety (kastrā´shən),

n 1. the fantasized fear of injury to or loss of the genital organs.
2. a general threat to the body image of a person or the unrealistic fear of bodily injury or loss of power or control.
References in periodicals archive ?
And then, if he must have felt elated about the way castration anxiety sounded, the theory that he built around it allowed him to sublimate his own sadism.
And the intensity of Hemingway's castration anxiety is difficult to ignore given stories such as The Sun Also Rises or "God Rest You Merry, Gentlemen.
After all, truck-stop glamour + rotating blade = castration anxiety spectacle par excellence.
Freud's 1919 paper is fairly precise about the defining effects of uncanny narratives and occurrences: Loosening rationality's grip, they permit repressed mental formations (primitive animism, infantile narcissism, castration anxiety, the death drive) to return, triggering panic, a paranoid impression of being menaced by unseen presences, and so on.