castor oil


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castor oil

 [kas´ter]
a fixed oil obtained from the seed of the castor bean plant (Ricinus communis); now used primarily as a topical emollient. When taken internally it acts as a powerful cathartic; because of its strength, other agents are now preferred for treatment of digestive disorders.

cas·tor oil

(kas'ter oyl),
A fixed oil expressed from the seeds of Ricinus communis (family Euphorbiaceae); a purgative.

castor oil

n.
A colorless or pale yellowish oil extracted from the seeds of the castor-oil plant, used pharmaceutically as a laxative and skin softener and industrially as a lubricant.

castor oil

[kas′tər]
Etymology: L, beaver, oleum, olive oil
an oil derived from Ricinus communis, used as a stimulant cathartic.
indications It is prescribed as a cleansing preparation of the bowel or colon before examination and, rarely, for constipation.
contraindications Symptoms of appendicitis, intestinal obstruction or perforation, and fecal impaction prohibit its use. It is not to be used during menstruation or pregnancy.
adverse effects Among the most serious adverse reactions are rectal bleeding and laxative dependence. Nausea, abdominal cramps, and dizziness also may occur.

castor oil

An oil cold-pressed from the kernel of Ricinus communis seeds, which contains glycerides of ricinoleic and isoricinoleic acids—e.g., dihydroxystearin, isoricinolein, palmitin and triricinolein; it has been used externally as an emollient and internally as a laxative.

castor oil

An oil cold-pressed from the kernel of Ricinus communis seeds, which contains glycerides of ricinoleic and isoricinoleic acids–eg, dihydroxystearin, isoricinolein, palmitin, and triricinolein; it has been used externally as an emollient and internally as a laxative. See Castor bean, Ricin.

cas·tor oil

(kas'tŏr oyl)
Fatty oil from castor beans used as a cathartic or lubricant.

castor oil

An oil derived from the poisonous seeds of the plant, Ricinus communis and formerly used to treat CONSTIPATION.

castor oil

a fixed oil obtained from the seed of the castor bean plant (ricinus communis); it has an irritant effect on the intestines and acts as a powerful purgative. Castor oil is also used externally as an emollient in seborrheic dermatitis and other skin diseases.

castor oil plant
false castor oil plant
see datura.
References in periodicals archive ?
2]) Silicone carbinol fluid 24 Dimethicone 22 Glycerin 66 Olive oil 33 Castor oil 36 Capryl caprylic triglyceride 30 Skin 27 Yellow iron oxide >73 Carbon black 40 Talc 48 Red iron oxide 28 Water 73 Table 2.
Table 1, presents the mean values of the free fatty acids liberated from oil by the hydrolysis of castor oil by the isolates (triplicates of same sample of castor seeds).
In this study, hydroethanolic extracts from leaves and seeds of 'Mirante' and wild castor oil plant applied at 10,000 ppm onto pieces of A.
The growth and sale of castor oil beans will provide Tianjin Nanbei
The castor oil is heated over two days and is then mixed with colour stones.
In the first step, the PU precursors were synthesized using PPG 1000 as the polyol, and castor oil as the multifunctional crosslinker in varying concentrations.
The chemical structure of castor oil is of great interest because of the wide range of reactions it affords to the oleochemical industry and the unique chemical that can be derived from it.
Other than palm oil, castor oil is also potential feedstock for bio-diesel oil especially as castor oil is not used much for other purpose such as for cooking oil.
At 90 min, there were no significant differences between the control and aqueous-extract-treated rats which received castor oil.
Viscosity testers are popular for fluids with viscosity ranging from castor oil or honey to tar.
CATHERINE Zeta-Jones strokes castor oil through her hair to maintain its thickness and glossiness.
Made from organic extra virgin olive oil, castor oil, unrefined beeswax and various herbal extracts and essential oils, Badger's signature balms ($3.