case study


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case study

n.
A detailed analysis of a person or group, especially as a model of medical, psychiatric, psychological, or social phenomena.

case study

a detailed analysis of a person or group with a particular disease or condition, noting characteristics of the disease or condition. Case studies are often used to call attention to new diseases or to diseases entering new populations.

case study

EBM
(1) An in-depth analysis and systematic description of one patient or group of similar patients to promote a detailed understanding of their circumstances.
(2) Research exploring the behaviour and experiences of an individual, group, organisation, community, nation or event. Case studies enable researchers to open up wider issues around their chosen subject

Epidemiology
An uncontrolled (prospective) or retrospective observational study involving an intervention and outcome in a single patient.
 
Medspeak
A description of an experience with a clinical practice innovation project that yields lessons that may be of interest to others.

case study

Anecdotal report, single case report Epidemiology An uncontrolled–prospective or retrospective observational study involving an intervention and outcome in a single Pt
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike a scientific article, the abstract for a case study is unstructured, i.
Case Study 3: PepsiCo plans European health push with Naked, Punica and PJs
The case study, Building a Six Sigma Measurement System in Financial Services, (www.
Case Study 3: General Mills leads the way to intrinsic heart health
A case study is "an exploration of a 'bounded system' or a case (or multiple cases) over time through detailed, in-depth data collection involving multiple sources of information rich in context" (Creswell, 1998, p.
Gastroenteritis at a University in Texas is the third in the Food-borne Disease Outbreak Investigation Case Study Series.
1 -- cover) ``Pierre Koening, Case Study House #22, Los Angeles,'' 1960.
This case study explored in detail the increased mission effectiveness that USAF F-15Cs employing data links achieved in comparison to F-15Cs using voice only communications.
However, the different perspectives and units of analysis that accompany an embedded case study requires the use and integration of quantitative and qualitative methods to achieve the goal of complete case understanding.
The authors present a compelling case study for HIV/AIDS in South Africa, where an emerging disease has gone unchecked and is having a devastating effect on a developed country.