load

(redirected from case load)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

load

 [lōd]
the quantity of something that is carried or borne.
case load the number of patients under the care of an individual health care worker.
viral load the number of copies of RNA of a given virus per milliliter of blood.

load

(lōd),
1. A departure from normal body content, as of water, salt, or heat; positive loads are quantities in excess of the normal; negative loads are quantities in deficit.
2. The quantity of a measurable entity borne by an object or organism.
[M.E. lode, fr. A.S. lād,]

load

a departure from normal body values for parameters such as water content, salt concentration, and heat. A positive load indicates a higher-than-normal value, whereas a negative load indicates a below-normal value.

load

A measurable quantity of a thing. See Patient load Drug slang 25 bags of heroin Medtalk The content of a substance or material. See Afterload, Front load, Standard load.

load

(lōd)
1. The quantity of a measurable entity borne by an object or organism.
2. A departure from normal body content, as of water, salt, or heat; positive loads are quantities in excess of the normal; negative loads are quantities in deficit.

load

deforming/potentially deforming forces applied to an object; loads (i.e. tension, compression and shear) often occur in combination (e.g. bending causes tension on one aspect and compression on the other; torsion imposes simultaneous tension, compression and shear)

load

(lōd)
Departure from normal body content; positive loads are quantities in excess of normal; negative loads are quantities in deficit.

load,

n an external force applied to an object.
load, occlusal,
n the stresses generated by functional or habitual contacting of the occlusal surfaces of the upper and lower teeth. There are two components of such stress loads: the vertically directed components and those components that tend to move a tooth or denture laterally. See also force, occlusal.

load

the quantity of a measurable form of work, e.g. metabolic or circulatory, borne by an organism, especially when it exceeds the normal amount of work for that process. Called also workload.
References in periodicals archive ?
Manna said he repeatedly pleaded with management in the Leominster office to address unmanageable case loads.
The question is whether the way clients are served in a program affects what proportion of these clients enter work or at what wage, for example, controlling for the demographics of the case load and the local labor market.
Meanwhile average case loads for first response staff have gone up from 19 to 26.
They do not get enough time, they have heavy case loads and there are financial restrictions.
When we can't find speech pathologists, case loads get higher,'' she said.
High case loads are compounded by pressures to meet increasing regulatory requirements and by performance standards that often involve excessive clerical tasks.
PSF, a private organization located in Gainesville, Florida that provides child welfare services to 11 counties in north-central Florida, chose Cubistix to develop a solution utilizing its advanced mapping technology and location analytics to help caseworkers and managers efficiently and cost-effectively visualize and manage their case loads, identify foster homes, fill gaps for services, and manage neighborhoods, all at the spatial level through the use of mapping technology.
Like its better-known counterpart, the youth drug court, the juvenile gun court is a specialty court that features small case loads, frequent hearings, immediate sanctions, family involvement, and treatment services.
BPI; Silver Spring, MD) is publishing Emergency Department Law, a monthly newsletter targeted to practicing physicians and attorneys involved with "increasing case loads, increased liability exposure and complicated legal reporting requirement" of emergency care units, BPI said.
Reasons for this low percentage of all the agencies, and the state vocational rehabilitation offices in particular, could be the non-availability of a staff member trained to work with family difficulties, and/or large case loads which would preclude family involvement beyond the imparting of necessary information.
4] Some suggest that highly competitive markets offer more services than less competitive ones, that service duplication in competitive markets is more expensive, and that case loads in competitive markets are frequently low.
We would also like it to be understood that the two directors of NAS Advocates Limited had both worked for a number of years in private solicitors practices, running their own case loads within busy litigation departments prior to setting up this business.

Full browser ?