cartilage

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cartilage

 [kahr´tĭ-lij]
a specialized, fibrous connective tissue present in adults, and forming most of the temporary skeleton in the embryo, providing a model in which most of the bones develop, and constituting an important part of the organism's growth mechanism; the three most important types are hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage, and fibrocartilage. Also, a general term for a mass of such tissue in a particular site in the body.
 Involvement of joint and cartilage in osteoarthritis. From ARHP Arthritis Teaching Slide Collection, American College of Rheumatology.
alar c's the cartilages of the wings of the nose.
aortic cartilage the second costal cartilage on the right side.
arthrodial cartilage (articular cartilage) that lining the articular surfaces of synovial joints.
arytenoid c's two pyramid-shaped cartilages of the larynx.
connecting cartilage that connecting the surfaces of an immovable joint.
costal cartilage a bar of hyaline cartilage that attaches a rib to the sternum in the case of true ribs, or to the immediately above rib in the case of the upper false ribs.
cricoid cartilage a ringlike cartilage forming the lower and back part of the larynx.
diarthrodial cartilage articular cartilage.
elastic cartilage cartilage that is more opaque, flexible, and elastic than hyaline cartilage, and is further distinguished by its yellow color. The ground substance is penetrated in all directions by frequently branching fibers that give all of the reactions for elastin.
ensiform cartilage xiphoid process.
fibrous cartilage fibrocartilage.
floating cartilage a detached portion of semilunar cartilage in the knee joint.
hyaline cartilage flexible, somewhat elastic, semitransparent cartilage with an opalescent bluish tint, composed of a basophilic fibril-containing substance with cavities in which the chondrocytes occur.
 Hyaline cartilage. The matrix nearest the chondrocytes is intensely staining; although the matrix appears homogeneous, collagen fibrils may be visualized by polarized light or electron microscopy. From Dorland's, 2000.
Meckel's cartilage the ventral cartilage of the first branchial arch.
permanent cartilage cartilage that does not normally become ossified.
Reichert's cartilage the dorsal cartilage of the second branchial arch.
reticular cartilage elastic cartilage.
semilunar cartilage one of the two interarticular cartilages of the knee joint.
temporary cartilage cartilage that is normally destined to be replaced by bone.
thyroid cartilage the shield-shaped cartilage of the larynx, underlying the laryngeal prominence on the surface of the neck.
vomeronasal cartilage either of the two narrow strips of cartilage, one on each side, of the nasal septum supporting the vomeronasal organ.
yellow cartilage elastic cartilage.

car·ti·lage

(kar'ti-lij), [TA] Avoid the misspellings cartiledge, cartlage, and other variants.
A connective tissue characterized by its nonvascularity and firm consistency; consists of cells (chondrocytes), an interstitial matrix of fibers (collagen), and ground substance (proteoglycans). There are three kinds of cartilage: hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage, and fibrocartilage. Nonvascular, resilient, flexible connective tissue found primarily in joints, the walls of the thorax, and tubular structures (for example, larynx, air passages, and ears); makes up most of the skeleton in early fetal life, but is slowly replaced by bone. For a gross anatomic description, see cartilago and its subentries.
Synonym(s): cartilago [TA], chondrus (1) , gristle
[L. cartilago (cartilagin-), gristle]

cartilage

/car·ti·lage/ (kahr´tĭ-lij) a specialized, fibrous connective tissue present in adults, and forming the temporary skeleton in the embryo, providing a model in which the bones develop, and constituting a part of the organism's growth mechanism; the three most important types are hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage, and fibrocartilage. Also, a general term for a mass of such tissue in a particular site in the body.
Enlarge picture
Nasal cartilages. (A), Lateral view; (B), median section.

alar cartilages  the cartilages of the wings of the nose.
aortic cartilage  the second costal cartilage on the right side.
arthrodial cartilage , articular cartilage that lining the articular surface of synovial joints.
arytenoid cartilage  one of the two pyramid-shaped cartilages of the larynx.
connecting cartilage  that connecting the surfaces of an immovable joint.
corniculate cartilage  a nodule of cartilage at the apex of each arytenoid cartilage.
costal cartilage  a bar of hyaline cartilage that attaches a rib to the sternum in the case of true ribs, or to the rib immediately above in the case of the upper false ribs.
cricoid cartilage  a ringlike cartilage forming the lower and back part of the larynx.
cuneiform cartilage  either of a pair of cartilages, one on either side in the aryepiglottic fold.
dentinal cartilage  the substance remaining after the lime salts of dentin have been dissolved in an acid.
diarthrodial cartilage  articular c.
elastic cartilage  cartilage whose matrix contains yellow elastic fibers.
ensiform cartilage  xiphoid process.
floating cartilage  a detached portion of semilunar cartilage in the knee joint.
hyaline cartilage  a flexible semitransparent substance with an opalescent tint, composed of a basophilic, fibril-containing substance with cavities in which the chondrocytes occur.
interosseous cartilage  connecting c.
Jacobson's cartilage  vomeronasal c.
permanent cartilage  cartilage which does not normally become ossified.
precursory cartilage  temporary c.
Santorini's cartilage  corniculate c.
semilunar cartilage  either of the two interarticular cartilages of the knee joint.
sesamoid cartilages  small cartilages found in the thyrohyoid ligament (sesamoid c. of larynx), on either side of the nose (sesamoid c. of nose), and occasionally in the vocal ligaments (sesamoid c. of vocal ligament) .
slipping rib cartilage  a loosened or deformed cartilage whose slipping over an adjacent rib cartilage may produce discomfort or pain.
temporary cartilage  cartilage that is being replaced by bone or that is destined to be replaced by bone.
thyroid cartilage  the shield-shaped cartilage of the larynx.
tracheal cartilages  see under ring.
triticeous cartilage  a small cartilage in the thyrohyoid ligament.
vomeronasal cartilage  either of the two strips of cartilage of the nasal septum supporting the vomeronasal organ.
Weitbrecht's cartilage  a pad of fibrocartilage sometimes present within the articular cavity of the acromioclavicular joint.
Wrisberg's cartilage  cuneiform c.
xiphoid cartilage  see under process.
Y cartilage  Y-shaped cartilage within the acetabulum, joining the ilium, ischium, and pubes.
yellow cartilage  elastic c.

cartilage

(kär′tl-ĭj)
n.
A tough, elastic, fibrous connective tissue that is a major constituent of the embryonic and young vertebrate skeleton and in most species is converted largely to bone with maturation. It is found in various parts of the human body, such as the joints, outer ear, and larynx.

cartilage

[kär′tilij]
Etymology: L, cartilago
a nonvascular dense supporting connective tissue composed of chondrocytes and various fibers or ground substance. It is found chiefly in the joints, the thorax, and various rigid tubes, such as the larynx, trachea, nose, and ear. Temporary cartilage, such as sesamoid bones (knee) and those that compose most of the fetal skeleton at an early stage, are later replaced by bone. Permanent cartilage remains unossified, except in certain diseases and, sometimes, in advanced age. Kinds of permanent cartilage are elastic cartilage, hyaline cartilage, and white fibrocartilage. cartilaginous, adj.

car·ti·lage

(kahr'ti-lăj) [TA]
A connective tissue characterized by its nonvascularity and firm consistency; consists of cells (chondrocytes), an interstitial matrix of fibers (collagen), and a ground substance (proteoglycans); found primarily in joints, the walls of the thorax, and tubular structures such as the larynx, air passages, and ears; comprises most of the skeleton in early fetal life, but is slowly replaced by bone. There are three kinds of cartilage: hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage, and fibrocartilage.
Synonym(s): cartilago [TA] , gristle.
[L. cartilago (cartilagin-), gristle]

cartilage

Gristle. A dense form of connective tissue performing various functions in the body such as providing bearing surfaces in the joints, flexible linkages for the ribs, and a supportive tissue in which bone may be formed during growth.

cartilage

or

gristle

a form of connective or skeletal tissue with a translucent, smooth, ‘plastic’ consistency, that allows diffusion of solutes through it. Cartilage is characterized by the presence of rounded cartilage corpuscles (CELLS), surrounded by a matrix of mucopolysaccharide (CHONDRIN) in which, besides the cartilage cells, there are numerous collagen fibres. Cartilage forms the first parts of the skull, vertebrae and long bones of the developing embryo but in adult mammals (and many other vertebrates) is largely replaced by bone. It remains at the ends of bones, in joints, at the ventral ends of the ribs and in a few other places to aid low-friction articulation. The types of cartilage are as follows:
  1. hyaline cartilage, which is bluish-white and transluscent and contains some very fine collagen fibres. It is present at rib ends, in tracheal rings, in the nose, in the embryos of all vertebrates and the adult stages of cartilagenous fishes.
  2. elastic cartilage, containing yellow fibres and present in the ear, the end of the nose, and the EUSTACHIAN TUBE.
  3. fibrocartilage, containing few cells and large numbers of fibres, and associated with joints subject to severe strains. It is present as discs between the vertebrae and in the pubic symphysis.

Cartilage

A tough, elastic connective tissue found in the joints, outer ear, nose, larynx, and other parts of the body.

cartilage

a dense connective tissue capable of withstanding pressure. There are several types according to the function each has to fulfil. There is relatively more cartilage in a child's skeleton but much of it has been converted into bone by adulthood. cartilaginous adj. See also knee joint, meniscus.

cartilage

specialized avascular connective tissue formed of chondrocytes (cells) and interstitial substance (matrix) in a chondromucoid ground substance; lubricated and protected from injury by the hydrostatic mechanism (high-speed movement or under high load) or the boundary surface phenomenon (moving slowly or under low load)
  • elastic cartilage; yellow cartilage chondrocytes surrounded by a matrix of elastic fibres, collagen fibres and ground substance

  • fibrocartilage less flexible cartilage with a high proportion of matrix collagen fibres

  • hyaline cartilage cartilage capping ends of long and adjacent bones; injured hyaline cartilage is usually replaced by fibrocartilage

cartilage,

n tough, fibrous connective tissue without nerves or blood supply that provides protection and support to joints, tubes, ends of long bones, and facial structures (e.g., ears and nose).
cartilage, elastic,
n soft and elastic tissue shaping the outer nose and ears and forming several internal structures, including the auditory tubes, the epiglottis, and the joint linings.
Enlarge picture
Cartilage, elastic.
cartilage, hyaline (hīˑ··ln karˑ·t·lej),
n smooth, pliant tissue that forms most of the skeleton of a fetus. At birth, osseous tissue replaces the hyaline cartilage throughout the body except at the nexus of the ribs and sternum, at the ends of bones, and in parts of the larynx, trachea, and nose. Also called
gristle.

car·ti·lage

(kahr'ti-lăj) [TA]
Connective tissue characterized by its nonvascularity and firm consistency; consists chondrocytes of collagen, and proteoglycans.
[L. cartilago (cartilagin-), gristle]

cartilage,

n a derivative of connective tissue arising from the mesenchyme. Typical hyaline type is a flexible, rather elastic material with a semitransparent, glasslike appearance. Its intercellular substance is a complex protein (chondromucoid) through which is distributed a large network of connective tissue fibers.
cartilage, articular,
n a thin layer of hyaline cartilage located on the joint surfaces of some bones. Not usually found on articular surfaces of temporomandibular joints, which are covered with an avascular fibrous tissue.
n the cartilage containing a rounded articular protrusion, or condyle, present at bone joints. Condylar cartilage of the mandible is a common type.
cartilage, cricoid,
n the most inferior cartilage of the larynx.
cartilage, Meckel's,
n.pr the cartilaginous process in the embryo derived from the mesenchymal tissue of the mandibular process.
cartilage, primary,
n the cartilage formed during fetal development that is not replaced by bone.
cartilage, Reichert's
n.pr the cartilaginous process located laterally in the embryonic tympanum; gives rise to styloid processes, stylohyoid ligaments, and lesser horns of hyoid bone.

cartilage

a specialized, gristly connective tissue present in both mature animals and embryos, providing a model in which most of the bones develop, and constituting an important part of the organism's growth mechanism; the three most important types are hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage and fibrocartilage. Also, a general term for a mass of such tissue in a particular site in the body.

alar c's
the cartilages of the wings of the nose.
annular ear cartilage
a ring of cartilage interposed between the rolled-up auricular cartilage and the skull.
arthrodial cartilage, articular cartilage
that clothing the articular surfaces of synovial joints.
arytenoid c's
two pyramid-shaped cartilages of the larynx.
auricular cartilage
cartilage of the pinna and much of the external ear canal.
cartilage canals
tunnels containing blood vessels incorporated in developing cartilage.
connecting cartilage
that connecting the surfaces of an immovable joint.
costal cartilage
a bar of hyaline cartilage that attaches a rib to the sternum in the case of true ribs, or to the immediately cranial rib in the case of the anterior false ribs.
cricoid cartilage
a ringlike cartilage forming the caudal part of the larynx.
diarthrodial cartilage
articular cartilage.
distal phalangeal cartilage
the ungual cartilages of the third phalanx in the horse lie mostly against the hoof wall but can be palpated if ossified. See also sidebone.
elastic cartilage
cartilage that is more opaque, flexible and elastic than hyaline cartilage, and is further distinguished by its yellow color. The ground substance is penetrated in all directions by frequently branching fibers that give all of the reactions for elastin.
cartilage emboli
see fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy.
ensiform cartilage
xiphoid process.
fibrous cartilage
fibrocartilage.
floating cartilage
a detached portion of semilunar cartilage in the stifle joint.
hoof cartilage
see distal phalangeal cartilage (above).
hyaline cartilage
flexible, somewhat elastic, semitransparent cartilage with an opalescent bluish tint, composed of a basophilic fibril-containing substance with cavities in which the chondrocytes occur.
interarytenoid cartilage
an occasional cartilage located between the two arytenoid cartilages.
nasal cartilage
rostral end to the internasal septum, separating the nasal cavities and anchoring the other cartilages around the nostrils.
parapatellar cartilage
cartilaginous plates medial and lateral to the patella in some species, e.g. dogs.
permanent cartilage
cartilage that does not normally become ossified.
retained enchondral cartilage cores
occur in ulnar metaphysis and lateral femoral condyles of young, giant breed dogs. Visible radiographically as radiolucent inverted cones, extending into the metaphysis, they are often associated with growth deformities such as forelimb valgus and genu valgum.
reticular cartilage
elastic cartilage.
scapular cartilage
dorsal extension of the scapula in ungulates; tends to calcify with age.
cartilage scissors
used for ear cropping in dogs.
semilunar cartilage
one of the two intra-articular cartilages of the stifle joint.
temporary cartilage
cartilage that is normally destined to be replaced by bone.
thyroid cartilage
the unpaired cartilage of the larynx to which the vocal folds attach.
tibial cartilage
the bed of cartilage located on the caudal surface of the intertarsal joint of birds; the tendons of the digital flexors pass through it.
ungual cartilage
see distal phalangeal cartilage (above).
vomeronasal cartilage
either of the two narrow strips of cartilage, one on each side, of the nasal septum supporting the vomeronasal organ.
xiphoid cartilage
posterior continuation of the sternum; supports the anterior abdominal wall, especially the linea alba.
yellow cartilage
elastic cartilage.