Camponotus

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Camponotus

ant genus, second intermediate host to the flukes Dicrocoelium spp.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hughes and his colleagues found that the infected carpenter ants were always latched onto the undersides of leaves 10 inches above the ground and almost always on leaves growing from the northwest side of the plant.
The carpenter ants were likely introduced to the nursery in palms shipped from Florida, as this species is known to nest in leaf axils of palms (Warner and Scheffrahan 2005).
Mature carpenter ants produce swarmers that spend their winters in nests and take flight in the spring.
Carpenter ants do not actually eat wood--they bore into the substance to make their nests, which are extensive networks of galleries that usually are started in soft, decayed areas.
Non-response bias tests showed that there was no significant difference between early and late responses concerning pole material preferences, carpenter ant attack levels, woodpecker attack levels, or amount spent each year for woodpecker repairs ([alpha] = 0.
Once in your house, these organisms live off anything made of cellulose, including structural wood, furniture, picture frames, and books; carpenter ants and carpenter bees use wood for nesting.
Although these stakes have killing properties, they're best used with a barrier treatment such as BAYER ADVANCED Gallon Carpenter Ant and Termite Killer Plus Concentrate (Item #216551).
This previous report may have been based on a misidentification of the carpenter ant Camponotus impressus (Roger), which has a soldier caste with an enlarged head used to exclude intruders (Walker & Stamps 1986) and has been documented in salt marshes (Rey 1981; Mccoy & Rey 1987).
Upon being infected by a fungus known as Ophiocordyceps unilateralis, a a carpenter ant remains alive for a short time.
Exceptions are a few species of carpenter ant that can bore into wood and weaken a house's structural supports.
The following ant species were tested: the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile Mayr; the bicolor trailing ant, Monomorium floricola (Jerdon); the Florida carpenter ant, Camponotus floridanus (Buckley); the pavement ant, Tetramorium sp.