carotid

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Related to carotids: monofilament, Carotenoids

carotid

 [kah-rot´id]
pertaining to the principal artery of the neck (the carotid artery). See anatomic Table of Arteries in the Appendices.
carotid endarterectomy surgical removal of atherosclerotic plaques within an extracranial carotid artery, usually the common carotid, done to prevent stroke in patients with 70 per cent or greater carotid stenosis. Patients who have a stroke in evolution or have recently had a stroke are not good candidates for the procedure. Surgery at this time could cause an infarcted area of the brain to hemorrhage when its blood supply is suddenly increased. In addition, there is a low success rate for those patients who have total occlusion of the internal carotid arteries.
Patient Care. Immediately after surgery special monitoring is necessary to assess the patient's neurologic status, including level of consciousness, orientation, and motor activity, especially on the side opposite the surgery. Because of the location of the surgical incision, an enlarging hematoma can rapidly produce respiratory distress. Aspiration also is possible because a hematoma can obstruct the trachea and damage the laryngeal nerve, preventing closure of the glottis.

Crucial observations include evaluation of neck size, noting the patient's ability to swallow, close observation and measurement of drainage, and measurement of respiratory rate and character. A tracheostomy tray and suction apparatus should be available even after the patient is transferred from the recovery room or intensive care unit. Neurologic assessment is necessary to detect complications associated with postoperative cerebral ischemia and cranial nerve damage. Because ischemia of the myocardium is also a possibility, continuous electrocardiograph monitoring is required. Since blood pressure may be increased by surgery, postoperative hypertension is not uncommon.
 Carotid endarterectomy. Plaques are removed from the artery to improve blood flow. Modified from Black and Matassarin-Jacobs, 2001.
carotid sinus syndrome syncope sometimes associated with convulsive seizures due to overactivity of the carotid sinus reflex. In certain susceptible persons the carotid sinus is too easily stimulated and symptoms are produced by sudden turning of the head or the wearing of a tight collar. Transient attacks of numbness or weakness of the face, arm, or leg, headache, and in some cases aphasia may also occur. The condition most commonly affects older males and may be a cause of unexplained falls. Diagnosis can be confirmed by a gentle massage of the carotid sinus area of a patient under monitoring. asystole for longer than 3 seconds or a reduction in systolic blood pressure of more than 500 mm Hg are considered positive indications. The syndrome can be subdivided into cardioinhibitory, vasodepressor, and mixed types. Dual chamber cardiac pacing is indicated in the cardioinhibitory and mixed types. Patients who have this condition should be educated to avoid triggering events.

ca·rot·id

(ka-rot'id),
Pertaining to any carotid structure.
[G. karōtides, the carotid arteries, fr. karoō, to put to sleep (because compression of the c. artery results in unconsciousness)]

carotid

/ca·rot·id/ (kah-rot´id) pertaining to the carotid artery, the principal artery of the neck.

carotid

(kə-rŏt′ĭd)
n.
Either of the two major arteries, one on each side of the neck, that carry blood to the head.
adj.
Of or relating to either of these arteries.

carotid

[kərot′id]
Etymology: Gk, karos, heavy sleep
pertaining to the arteries that supply the head and neck. See also carotid body, carotid sinus, common carotid artery.

ca·rot·id

(kă-rot'id)
Pertaining to any carotid structure.

ca·rot·id

(kă-rot'id)
Pertaining to any carotid structure.

carotid (kərot´id),

n either one of the two main right and left arteries of the neck.
carotid stenosis,
n the narrowing and hardening of the carotid artery.
carotid triangle,

carotid

relating to the carotid artery, the principal artery of the neck. See Table 9.

carotid body
a small neurovascular structure lying in the bifurcation of the common carotid arteries, containing chemoreceptors that monitor oxygen content in blood and help to regulate respiration. Called also glomus caroticum.
carotid body tumors
usually unilateral nonfunctional adenoma, chemodectoma, nonchromaffin paraganglioma, or locally invasive carcinoma which may cause deviation of the trachea.
carotid canal
transmits the internal carotid artery to the cranial cavity through the pars petrosa of the temporal bone.
carotid sheath
contains the common carotid artery, internal jugular vein and vagosympathetic trunk.
carotid sinus
a dilatation of the proximal portion of the internal carotid or distal portion of the common carotid artery, containing in its wall pressoreceptors which are stimulated by changes in blood pressure.
carotid sinus reflex
slowing of the heart rate when pressure is applied over the carotid sinus.
carotid sinus syndrome
syncope sometimes associated with convulsive seizures due to overactivity of the carotid sinus reflex.
References in periodicals archive ?
The anterior branch of the internal carotid inside the skull is the frontal artery which supplies the frontal lobes, responsible for memory and 'personality'.
Carotid chemodectomas are called paragangliomas or carotid body tumors (Fig 1).
A carotid artery blocked by plaque is a tragedy waiting to happen.
The authors found that the mean level of deviation of medialized carotids was at the level of the body of C2.
I just recently had a test to find out how much blockage there was in my carotid artery.
The MAVErIC I and II clinical studies, which comprise a total of 498 patients, are designed to evaluate the short- and long-term safety and efficacy of Medtronic's Exponent Carotid Stent System and the GuardWire(R) Balloon Occlusion device in reducing the incidence of stroke and death in patients with carotid artery disease.
Carotid artery blow-out syndrome (CBS) is an increasingly recognized complication following the treatment of head and neck malignancies.
Surgeons began clearing away such blockages, a procedure called carotid endarterectomy, in 1954.
Complete Carotid Solution' Now Includes Innovative System Combining Exponent Carotid Stent and Interceptor(R) PLUS Carotid Embolic Protection Filter System
We are pleased that the ARCHeR trials demonstrated that high-risk patients benefited from being treated with carotid artery stenting.
Scheduled to discuss the Guidant-sponsored ARCHeR trials and carotid artery stenting are Beverly A.
Guidant Corporation (NYSE:GDT), a world leader in the treatment of cardiac and vascular disease, today announced completion of patient enrollment in its second clinical trial designed to evaluate carotid artery stenting as a minimally invasive alternative for patients who are ineligible for current surgical options or at high surgical-risk.