carotid


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carotid

 [kah-rot´id]
pertaining to the principal artery of the neck (the carotid artery). See anatomic Table of Arteries in the Appendices.
carotid endarterectomy surgical removal of atherosclerotic plaques within an extracranial carotid artery, usually the common carotid, done to prevent stroke in patients with 70 per cent or greater carotid stenosis. Patients who have a stroke in evolution or have recently had a stroke are not good candidates for the procedure. Surgery at this time could cause an infarcted area of the brain to hemorrhage when its blood supply is suddenly increased. In addition, there is a low success rate for those patients who have total occlusion of the internal carotid arteries.
Patient Care. Immediately after surgery special monitoring is necessary to assess the patient's neurologic status, including level of consciousness, orientation, and motor activity, especially on the side opposite the surgery. Because of the location of the surgical incision, an enlarging hematoma can rapidly produce respiratory distress. Aspiration also is possible because a hematoma can obstruct the trachea and damage the laryngeal nerve, preventing closure of the glottis.

Crucial observations include evaluation of neck size, noting the patient's ability to swallow, close observation and measurement of drainage, and measurement of respiratory rate and character. A tracheostomy tray and suction apparatus should be available even after the patient is transferred from the recovery room or intensive care unit. Neurologic assessment is necessary to detect complications associated with postoperative cerebral ischemia and cranial nerve damage. Because ischemia of the myocardium is also a possibility, continuous electrocardiograph monitoring is required. Since blood pressure may be increased by surgery, postoperative hypertension is not uncommon.
 Carotid endarterectomy. Plaques are removed from the artery to improve blood flow. Modified from Black and Matassarin-Jacobs, 2001.
carotid sinus syndrome syncope sometimes associated with convulsive seizures due to overactivity of the carotid sinus reflex. In certain susceptible persons the carotid sinus is too easily stimulated and symptoms are produced by sudden turning of the head or the wearing of a tight collar. Transient attacks of numbness or weakness of the face, arm, or leg, headache, and in some cases aphasia may also occur. The condition most commonly affects older males and may be a cause of unexplained falls. Diagnosis can be confirmed by a gentle massage of the carotid sinus area of a patient under monitoring. asystole for longer than 3 seconds or a reduction in systolic blood pressure of more than 500 mm Hg are considered positive indications. The syndrome can be subdivided into cardioinhibitory, vasodepressor, and mixed types. Dual chamber cardiac pacing is indicated in the cardioinhibitory and mixed types. Patients who have this condition should be educated to avoid triggering events.

ca·rot·id

(ka-rot'id),
Pertaining to any carotid structure.
[G. karōtides, the carotid arteries, fr. karoō, to put to sleep (because compression of the c. artery results in unconsciousness)]

carotid

/ca·rot·id/ (kah-rot´id) pertaining to the carotid artery, the principal artery of the neck.

carotid

(kə-rŏt′ĭd)
n.
Either of the two major arteries, one on each side of the neck, that carry blood to the head.
adj.
Of or relating to either of these arteries.

carotid

[kərot′id]
Etymology: Gk, karos, heavy sleep
pertaining to the arteries that supply the head and neck. See also carotid body, carotid sinus, common carotid artery.

ca·rot·id

(kă-rot'id)
Pertaining to any carotid structure.

ca·rot·id

(kă-rot'id)
Pertaining to any carotid structure.

carotid (kərot´id),

n either one of the two main right and left arteries of the neck.
carotid stenosis,
n the narrowing and hardening of the carotid artery.
carotid triangle,

carotid

relating to the carotid artery, the principal artery of the neck. See Table 9.

carotid body
a small neurovascular structure lying in the bifurcation of the common carotid arteries, containing chemoreceptors that monitor oxygen content in blood and help to regulate respiration. Called also glomus caroticum.
carotid body tumors
usually unilateral nonfunctional adenoma, chemodectoma, nonchromaffin paraganglioma, or locally invasive carcinoma which may cause deviation of the trachea.
carotid canal
transmits the internal carotid artery to the cranial cavity through the pars petrosa of the temporal bone.
carotid sheath
contains the common carotid artery, internal jugular vein and vagosympathetic trunk.
carotid sinus
a dilatation of the proximal portion of the internal carotid or distal portion of the common carotid artery, containing in its wall pressoreceptors which are stimulated by changes in blood pressure.
carotid sinus reflex
slowing of the heart rate when pressure is applied over the carotid sinus.
carotid sinus syndrome
syncope sometimes associated with convulsive seizures due to overactivity of the carotid sinus reflex.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pseudoaneurysm of the common carotid artery related to ongoing trauma due to retained foreign body is extremely rare, and no such case is reported earlier.
Carotid intima-media thickness and cognitive impairment
Lie (4) developed a classification system with six types of collateral circulation patterns, which can be seen with carotid absence (Figure 4):
This report studies Carotid Endarterectomy in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with sales, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering Abbott Laboratories, Omron, Advanced Cardiac Therapeutics, Carmat, Volcano, AtriCure, Berlin Heart, Biosensors International, Biotronik, Cordis, CorMatrix Cardiovascular, Defibtech, Deltex Medical, Edwards Lifesciences, Elixir Medical, Endologix, Heartware International, Hexacath, Impulse Dynamics, InspireMD, Jarvix Heart, Opto Circuits (India), OrbusNeich, Philips Healthcare, REVA Medical, SeptRx, Shimadzu, SMT and Stereotaxis.
Keywords: Carotid artery stenosis, Carotid artery stenting, Stroke.
Two years earlier, the patient was diagnosed with a small common carotid artery aneurism measuring 2.
If your doctor suspects carotid artery disease based on your symptoms, medical history or cardiovascular risk factors (high blood pressure, cholesterol abnormalities, diabetes, obesity, smoking), he or she may order a carotid ultrasound, as well as other testing to confirm any ultrasound findings, gauge your stroke risk, and guide treatment decisions.
Carotid artery stenosis can be assessed by means of noninvasive high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography of the carotid arteries.
Indications for CEA in symptomatic patients were an internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis [greater than or equal to] 50%.
History of cerebrovascular accident, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol (especially LDL), age over 60, female gender, and severe coronary artery disease are the most common risk factors associated with the occurrence of carotid artery stenosis (Sabeti, S.
A severe narrowing or blockage of the carotid artery may require a physician to perform a minimally-invasive balloon angioplasty procedure in which a balloon on a long flexible tube called a catheter is threaded through a patient s vasculature from the groin to the site of the blockage, inflated to open the artery and then a small mesh tube called a stent is placed at the site to keep the artery open.
Study leader Dr Brajesh Lal, from the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, US, said: "To date, the focus of diagnosis and management of carotid artery blockages has been prevention of stroke since that was the only harm that these blockages were thought to cause to patients.