carotenoid

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carotenoid

 [kah-rot´ĕ-noid]
1. any member of a group of red, orange, or yellow pigmented lipids found in carrots, sweet potatoes, green leaves, and some animal tissues; examples are the carotenes, lycopene, and xanthophyll.
2. marked by yellow color.

ca·rot·e·noid

(ka-rot'e-noyd),
1. Resembling carotene; having a yellow color.
2. One of the carotenoids.

carotenoid

/ca·rot·e·noid/ (kah-rot´ĕ-noid)
1. any of a group of red, orange, or yellow pigmented polyisoprenoid hydrocarbons synthesized by prokaryotes and higher plants and concentrating in animal fat when eaten; examples are β-carotene, lycopene, and xanthophyll.
2. marked by yellow color.

provitamin A carotenoids  carotenoids, particularly the carotenes, that can be converted to vitamin A in the body.

carotenoid

(kə-rŏt′n-oid′)
n.
Any of a class of yellow to red pigments, including the carotenes and the xanthophylls.
adj.
Of or relating to such a pigment.

carotenoid

[kərot′ənoid]
any of a group of red, yellow, or orange highly unsaturated pigments that are found in foods such as carrots, sweet potatoes, and leafy green vegetables. Many of these substances, such as carotene, are used in the formation of vitamin A in the body, whereas others, including lycopene and xanthophyll, show no vitamin A activity. Also spelled carotinoid.

carotenoid

Any of a family of nutrients that are precursors of vitamin A and have antioxidant activity. While beta carotene1 is the best known of the group, long assumed to be responsible for the reduction of strokes, cardiovascular disease and cancersm 600 carotenoids have been identified. 40 are common in fruits and vegetables with the highest concentration in tomato juice, followed by kale, collard greens, spinach, sweet potato, chard, watermelon, carrots and pumpkin; high carotenoid consumption is associated with a decreased incidence of bladder, colon, lung and skin cancers, as well as growth of cancer cells in general.

carotenoid

Nutrition A vitamin A precursor with antioxidant activity; although beta carotene is the best known of the group, 600 carotenoids have been identified; 40 are common in fruits and vegetables; high carotenoid consumption is associated with ↓ risk of bladder, colon, lung, skin CAs and growth of CA cells. See Beta carotene, Vitamin A.

ca·rot·e·noid

(kă-rot'ĕ-noyd)
1. Resembling carotene; having a yellow color.
2. One of the carotenoids.

carotenoid

1. any member of a group of red, orange or yellow pigmented polyisoprenoid lipids found in carrots, sweet potatoes, green leaves and some animal tissues; examples are the carotenes, lycopene and xanthophyll.
2. marked by yellow color.
3. lipochrome.

carotenoid pigments
contribute to the yellow staining of fatty tissues especially in horses, Channel Island breeds of cattle and old cats.
References in periodicals archive ?
Baltimore Oriole feathers naturally contain a complex mixture of eight carotenoid pigments that range in color from yellow to red on TLC.
Carotenoid pigments in male House Finch plumage in relation to age, subspecies, and ornamental coloration.
IQF's feed carotenoid pigments in particular will align with Novus' feed preservative and dietary antioxidant product families, said the company.
The link between diet and plumage coloration should be particularly strong for species that have carotenoid-based plumages, which are highly dependent on carotenoid pigments obtained from food sources (Moller et al.
Many bird species use carotenoid pigments as colourants, which are responsible for most of their red, orange and yellow coloration.
A red snow alga, for example, develops 12 carotenoid pigments.
Young barn swallow gapes vary from a greenish yellow to bright red, depending on the abundance of carotenoid pigments.
Inhibiting this enzyme leads to a reduction of carotenoid pigments, and ultimately, destruction of leaf chlorophyll in sensitive species.
Lycopene, one of the carotenoid pigments in tomatoes, is a well-known antioxidant.
cardinalis' red color, which results from high concentrations of anthocyanin and carotenoid pigments, attracts hummingbirds but goes unnoticed by bumblebees, which, Bradshaw points out, don't detect red.