carotenoid


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carotenoid

 [kah-rot´ĕ-noid]
1. any member of a group of red, orange, or yellow pigmented lipids found in carrots, sweet potatoes, green leaves, and some animal tissues; examples are the carotenes, lycopene, and xanthophyll.
2. marked by yellow color.

ca·rot·e·noid

(ka-rot'e-noyd),
1. Resembling carotene; having a yellow color.
2. One of the carotenoids.

carotenoid

/ca·rot·e·noid/ (kah-rot´ĕ-noid)
1. any of a group of red, orange, or yellow pigmented polyisoprenoid hydrocarbons synthesized by prokaryotes and higher plants and concentrating in animal fat when eaten; examples are β-carotene, lycopene, and xanthophyll.
2. marked by yellow color.

provitamin A carotenoids  carotenoids, particularly the carotenes, that can be converted to vitamin A in the body.

carotenoid

(kə-rŏt′n-oid′)
n.
Any of a class of yellow to red pigments, including the carotenes and the xanthophylls.
adj.
Of or relating to such a pigment.

carotenoid

[kərot′ənoid]
any of a group of red, yellow, or orange highly unsaturated pigments that are found in foods such as carrots, sweet potatoes, and leafy green vegetables. Many of these substances, such as carotene, are used in the formation of vitamin A in the body, whereas others, including lycopene and xanthophyll, show no vitamin A activity. Also spelled carotinoid.

carotenoid

Any of a family of nutrients that are precursors of vitamin A and have antioxidant activity. While beta carotene1 is the best known of the group, long assumed to be responsible for the reduction of strokes, cardiovascular disease and cancersm 600 carotenoids have been identified. 40 are common in fruits and vegetables with the highest concentration in tomato juice, followed by kale, collard greens, spinach, sweet potato, chard, watermelon, carrots and pumpkin; high carotenoid consumption is associated with a decreased incidence of bladder, colon, lung and skin cancers, as well as growth of cancer cells in general.

carotenoid

Nutrition A vitamin A precursor with antioxidant activity; although beta carotene is the best known of the group, 600 carotenoids have been identified; 40 are common in fruits and vegetables; high carotenoid consumption is associated with ↓ risk of bladder, colon, lung, skin CAs and growth of CA cells. See Beta carotene, Vitamin A.

ca·rot·e·noid

(kă-rot'ĕ-noyd)
1. Resembling carotene; having a yellow color.
2. One of the carotenoids.

carotenoid

1. any member of a group of red, orange or yellow pigmented polyisoprenoid lipids found in carrots, sweet potatoes, green leaves and some animal tissues; examples are the carotenes, lycopene and xanthophyll.
2. marked by yellow color.
3. lipochrome.

carotenoid pigments
contribute to the yellow staining of fatty tissues especially in horses, Channel Island breeds of cattle and old cats.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although carotenoids are more frequently reseached in the study of bird coloration, Dr.
The two natural carotenoid sources such as powdered Nannochloropsis oculata (Group A) and powdered Porphyridium cruentum (Group B) used in the experimental diet and the control diet (Group C), were not included any algae powder as a carotenoid source.
The effects of both encapsulated butyric acid and microemulsified carotenoid diets on the growth parameters for the fishes throughout the experimental periods are given in Table 2.
Carotenoid degradation can also occur during storage, particularly for dried sweet potato [4, 8, 13, 14].
Analysis of the data collected at each sampling time shows that the total carotenoid content in the liver was significantly different within T90 (P < 0.
The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), conducted by the National Institutes of Health's National Eye Institute, examined the effects of a "cocktail" of carotenoids and other vitamins and minerals linked to eye health (see "The Best Eye Health Supplements") on the risk of cataracts and advanced AMD.
The 56-day feeding test was conducted in broilers to decide if the carotenoids in corn distillers oil, sometimes referred to as CDO, could be transferred to them.
The carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin absorb blue light in sensitive parts of your inner eye and prevent damage.
This fortunate matchup between the fatty acid and carotenoid profiles in avocado even extends to the relationship between avocado and other foods.
Beta carotene is the most common form of carotenoid, but there are hundreds of other carotenoids.