carnivory


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Related to carnivory: carnivorous

carnivory

Consumption of animal flesh; meat-eatery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Investigations of mineral nutrition of CPs under natural conditions are much less detailed than those performed in greenhouses, but they show clearly the ecological importance of carnivory - including the benefit, cost, and limitations - for natural growth and development.
The importance of carnivory for seasonal gain of N, P, and K and nutrient economy were thoroughly studied in three Pinguicula species growing in northern Sweden (Karlsson et al.
The faster turnover of leaves of fed plants represented one of the physiological costs of carnivory.
The role of microelements in carnivory is still unclear.
Thus, the development of carnivory is partly blocked under high-nutrient conditions.
Knight (1988) estimated that this species could compensate up to 75% of its seasonal N gain by carnivory.
Catching of prey significantly promotes their growth, and it may be concluded that carnivory is ecologically very important in these plants.
1984) assume that mineral nutrient uptake due to carnivory should achieve positive photosynthetic benefits, as compared to the costs of carnivory, only in nutrient-poor, sunny, and moist habitats, whereas negative photosynthetic benefits would occur in shady habitats.
Plant carnivory developed as an adaptation to growth in nutrient-poor and wet or waterlogged soils, in which normal root functions are endangered.
Under high-nutrient conditions, the growth of some CP species is poor and plants lose their features of carnivory.
rotundifolia, may be generalized as follows: carnivory is not indispensable for greenhouse growing CPs, but it is almost indispensable for CPs in natural habitats.
The ecophysiological significance of carnivory in Utricularia vulgaris.