cariogenicity

car·i·o·ge·nic·i·ty

(kār'ē-ō-jĕ-nis'i-tē),
Potential for caries production.

car·i·o·ge·nic·i·ty

(kar'ē-ō-jĕ-nis'i-tē)
Potential for caries production.

car·i·o·ge·nic·i·ty

(kar'ē-ō-jĕ-nis'i-tē)
Potential for caries production.

cariogenicity (ker´ēōjənis´itē),

n the ability of a substance to induce or potentiate the formation of dental caries.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bacteria not only metabolize sugars to produce lactic acid that attacks the dental enamel, but also synthesize extracellular polysaccharides, mainly dextran, a component of the plaque, thus reinforcing cariogenicity of easily assimilated carbohydrates [6].
Loveren C Diet and dental caries: cariogenicity may depend more on oral hygiene using fluorides than on diet or type of carbohydrate European Journal of Paediatic Dentistry.
mutans cariogenicity, effect on expression of genes involved in biofilm formation and caries development in rats.
To date, few studies have reported on the cariogenicity of human breast milk.
Prescribers and parents should be encouraged to use sugar-free formulations wherever possible, to be aware of the cariogenicity of these products if sugar-free formulations are not available, and to adhere to administration schedules that minimise cariogenic effects.
Diet: Important components of dietary education for the parents include the cariogenicity of certain foods and beverages, role of frequency of consumption of these substances and the demineralization/remineralization process.
Havenaar, "Microbial Investigations on the Cariogenicity of the Sugar Subsitute Lactitol," unpublished report from the Department of Preventive Dentistry and Oral Microbiology, University of Utrecht, the Netherlands (1976).
A biologic mechanism for lead cariogenicity has not been identified, however.
Trehalose is less than half as sweet as sucrose, with lower cariogenicity, and is easy to use in a wide range of food and beverage products.
Biology, immunology and cariogenicity of Streptococcus mutans and dental caries prevention.
Although monosaccharides (glucose and fructose) and disaccharides (lactose, maltose and sucrose) can all be metabolized by cariogenic bacteria, (27) the actual cariogenicity of foods and beverages varies considerably (Table II).