carinated


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

car·i·nat·ed

(kăr′ə-nā′tĭd)
adj.
Carinate.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Absent from the Congo materials, however, are the bilobial and carinated vessels associated with the later phase of Okala (Clist 2005: 418).
The assemblage from overlying unit FAS 217 in stratum R differs in the much higher proportion of straight bladelets, many of which cannot have been produced on carinated cores.
Similarly the carinated, wide- mouthed cooldng vessels in Grey ware recall present day handi produced in Gilund village (Figure 8).
carinated cores, which to us indicate that the assemblages comprise a mixture of earlier and later material.
Singer-Avitz, who extends the influence to other types like globular and carinated bowls, says that "the adoption or integration of certain pottery forms into the ceramic assemblage does not attest to any change in a society's values" (Singer-Avitz 2007: 192).
What follows is a masterly and detailed review of various aspects of Mesolithic and Early Neolithic British archaeological data, including the Carinated Bowl horizon, mounds, megaliths and flint mines.
The Early Jezireh 0 pottery identified here includes some beveled rim bowls, carinated bowls, bowls with crude linear incised designs, and several types that persisted in the subsequent Ninevite 5 period, such as crescent-lugged cookpots and cups with horizontal ribbing.
This species can be distinguished by a single row of punctures along claval suture, and by the pronotum laterally carinated.
Comprising 20 per cent of the assemblage are two bowl types, carinated and open (Figure 3; Chittick 1974: 322-24).
A possible example of Phoenician M = mu in a votive inscription on a bronze carinated bowl (15) is problematic, as the author notes (the text as transcribed ignores the numeral 2 in the original).
long Dufour bladelets, large carinated scrapers, split-base osseous points), which are apparently absent from Britain.