caries


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caries

 [kar´e-ēz, kar´ēz]
decay, as of bone or teeth. adj., adj ca´rious.
bottle mouth caries early childhood caries.
dental caries see dental caries.
dry caries (caries sic´ca) a form of tuberculous caries of the joints and ends of bones.
early childhood caries severe dental caries that are promoted by the sugars, acids, and sometimes Streptococcus mutans in a bottle of milk or juice left in contact with a child's primary teeth; this can also occur from contact with breast milk left in a sleeping child's mouth. The condition is preventable; no child should be permitted to fall asleep nursing on any liquid other than plain water. Called also bottle mouth caries.
recurrent caries dental caries beneath the margin of an existing tooth restoration.

car·ies

(kār'ēz),
1. Microbial destruction or necrosis of teeth.
2. Obsolete term for tuberculosis of bones or joints.
[L. dry rot]

caries

/car·ies/ (kar´ēz) (kar´e-ēz) decay, as of bone or teeth.ca´rious
dental caries  a destructive process causing decalcification of the tooth enamel and leading to continued destruction of enamel and dentin, and cavitation of the tooth.

caries

(kâr′ēz)
n.
1. Decay of a bone or tooth, especially dental caries.
2. (used with a pl. verb) Instances of such decay, especially dental cavities: a child with several caries.

caries

[ker′ēz]
Etymology: L, decay

caries

Dentistry
Tooth decay. The destruction of tooth enamel and dentin, which is linked to infection by Streptococcus mutans and microaerophilic organisms that thrive when protected by a layer of hardened dental plaque; caries is most common in the young with refined carbohydrate-rich diets, especially in “snackers” who have increased oral pH; caries may affect older patients with diabetes, cancer or immunodeficient states.

Medical history
Obsolete for tuberculosis of bone and joints.
 
Orthopaedics
Osteolytic, softened and discoloured bone secondary to chronic periostitis and periperiosteitis, with formation of cold abscesses filled with a cheesy, fetid, pus-like substance, which extends through soft tissue to the surface via a sinus.
 
Vox populi
Cavities, cavity.

caries

Dentistry Cavity, tooth decay The destruction of tooth enamel and dentin, which is linked to infection by Streptococcus mutans and microaerophilic organisms that thrive when protected by a layer of hardened dental plaque; caries is most common in the young with refined carbohydrate-rich diets, especially in 'snackers' who have ↑ oral pH; caries may affect older Pts with DM, CA, or immunodeficiencies. See Fluoridation, Periodontal disease, Plaque, Tartar.

car·ies

, pl. caries (kar'ēz)
Microbial destruction or necrosis of teeth.
[L. dry rot]

caries

Decay of a tooth or a bone.

caries

progressive decay of a bone or tooth. Dental caries is often caused by bacterial action on sugary foods and sweets, producing acids that destroy tooth enamel. fluoride in the water supply is protective.

Caries

The medical term for tooth decay.
Mentioned in: Tooth Decay

car·ies

, pl. caries (kar'ēz)
Microbial destruction or necrosis of teeth.
[L. dry rot]

caries (ker´ēz),

n in dentistry, the decay of a tooth. Colloquial term is
cavity.
Enlarge picture
Advanced caries.
caries, arrested,
n the state existing when the progress of the decay process has halted. It is noted by its dark staining without any breakdown of tooth tissues.
Caries Assessment Tool (CAT),
n.pr an analysis that examines the risk factors for the development of dental caries in infants and young children. Risk factors such as the environment, family history, and general health can be identified early, thereby reducing a patient's risk for developing dental caries and other diseases of the teeth and gingival tissues.
caries, baby bottle,
n See caries, early childhood (EEC).
caries, cemental (root surface),
n the decay of the cementum that occurs as a result of gingival recession and exposure of the root surface. See also caries, cervical (root surface).
caries, cervical (root surface),
n the decay that appears on the root at the cementoenamel junction or the neck as a result of gingival recession and exposure of the root surface. See also caries, cemental (root surface).
caries, chronic,
n a form of caries that occurs over time and demands regular dental intervention.
caries, compound,
n a type of caries that affects two or more surfaces of a tooth.
caries, early childhood (EEC),
n a form of severe dental decay occurring in young children that is caused by long and frequent exposure to liquids that are high in sugar, such as milk or juice. Because this form can damage the underlying bone structure, it may affect the development of permanent teeth.
caries, enamel,
n the decay that occurs in the enamel of a tooth because of a fissure or the collection of bacterial plaque. It appears first as white spots, which later darken to brown.
caries, gross,
n a form of caries with advanced dental decay that is easily seen clinically.
caries, healed,
n See caries, arrested.
caries, incipient,
n a decayed part of a tooth in which the lesion is just coming into existence.
caries, nursing,
n See caries, early childhood (EEC).
caries, pit-and-fissure,
caries, plaque-related,
n the caries associated with plaque formation. Most commonly located in the pits and fissures of the teeth, especially the molar and premolar teeth, and along the gingival tissue and also the margins associated with dental restorations.
caries, proximal,
n decay occurring in the mesial or distal surface of a tooth.
caries, rampant,
n a suddenly appearing, widespread, rapidly progressing type of caries.
caries, recurrent,
n the extension of the carious process beyond the margin of a restoration. Also called
secondary caries.
caries, residual,
n (residual carious dentin), the decayed material left in a prepared cavity and over which a restoration is placed.
caries, root,
n tooth decay occurring on a portion of the root that is exposed.
Enlarge picture
Root caries.
caries, senile
n older term for the decay noted particularly in the elderly when supporting tissues have receded; occurs in cementum, usually on proximal surfaces of the teeth.
caries, smooth surface,
n the decay that occurs on the smooth surfaces of the tooth. See also caries, proximal dental and
S. mutans.
caries, vaccine,
n a vaccine currently under development to treat dental caries by inoculating against bacteria commonly known to contribute to their formation, particularly
S. mutans.

caries

decay, as of bone or teeth.

dental caries
demineralization and loss of substance of the hard tissues of the teeth, leading to continued destruction of enamel and dentine, and cavitation of the tooth. It is a very rare disease in animals. Occurs occasionally in sheep. May occur as pits or fissures. Called also a cavity.

Patient discussion about caries

Q. Can I treat dental Caries with antibiotics? I heard it’s a contagious disease, which means there are bacteria causing it. That means I can kill them by taking antibiotics no?

A. Your mouth has 500 different known bacteria in it. And a large amount of viruses and fungus. Taking antibiotics will not stop them from destroying your teeth. Maintaining good oral hygiene will, and with much less side effects…

Q. Dental Caries and Stress are related? Can it be possible that dental caries (cavities) be caused by stress? It seems to me that it can, because stress can cause all kinds of other health problems then why can't it also cause cavities. I have tried to find answers to question online, but have been unsuccessful. Sure would be great to know the answer to this.

A. if you understand the question "dental carries and stress are related?"

there are many factors that cause cavities ...

- poor hygiene
- poor diet
- malnutrition
- disease or illness
- and stress

it is well documented in the medical and alternative fields

Q. How do you differentiate between fluorosis and caries? Both appear as white spots on the teeth, so clinically how do you differentiate between them? I know it has something to do with their appearance while wet and dry, but I am not sure what? please help me I can't find this in any book.

A. Only mild fluorosis is seen as white stop lesion on the tooth. It usually comes with brown spots. Look for them. Another method is trying to stick a dental explorer into it (not the Microsoft one- it’ll only be a portal for viruses..) and because caries is demineralized area it will feel kind of sticky. But I wouldn’t do that…it can harm the teeth. Another way is by an x ray. Fluorosis- you will see it as a whiter spot. Caries- a more translucent spot.

More discussions about caries
References in periodicals archive ?
Department of Human Health and Service and the American Dental Association draw no conclusions on the vitamin D evidence as it relates to dental caries.
Many studies have suggested that a reduced salivary flow rate results in a higher incidence of caries (Vehkalahti, Nikula-Sarakorpi, & Paunio, 1996; Vitorino, Calheiros-Lobo, Duarte, Domingues, & Amado, 2006).
Figures 1-4 show the behavior of surveyed mothers concerning the prevention of dental caries.
A[cedilla] Specific bacteria (regardless of other factors, caries cannot occur without bacteria.
Dental morphological anomalies may be protective against caries formation.
The statistical comparison of the caries surfaces was insignificant at the beginning of the experiment but became significant after 24 month.
Dentists often use Caries Risk Assessment (CRA) in their clinical practices, but usually only on an intuitive level.
We do find that some of these sugar types are strongly positively correlated with the number of caries," he said.
We know caries management is achievable by utilizing evidence-based approaches to reverse, stop and prevent tooth decay, and by establishing inter-professional partnerships that can help reduce disparities in certain populations of children.
According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, "A randomized trial of xylitol syrup (8g/ day) reduced early childhood caries by 50 to 70 percent in children 15 to 25 months of age.