caregiver

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caregiver

 [kār´giv″er]
a lay individual who assumes responsibility for the physical and emotional needs of another who is incapable of self care. See also caregiver role fatigue and caregiver role strain. Called also caretaker.

caregiver

(kâr′gĭv′ər)
n.
1. An individual, such as a physician, nurse, or social worker, who assists in the identification, prevention, or treatment of an illness or disability.
2. An individual, such as a family member or guardian, who takes care of a child or dependent adult.

care′giv′ing adj. & n.

caregiver

one who contributes the benefits of medical, social, economic, or environmental resources to a dependent or partially dependent individual, such as a critically ill person.

caregiver

Health care The person–eg, a family member or a designated HCW–who cares for a Pt with Alzheimer's disease, other form of dementia or chronic debilitating disease requiring provision of nonmedical protective and supportive care

care·giv·er

(kār'giv-ĕr)
1. General term for a physician, nurse, or other health care practitioner who cares for patients.
2. Any person, including a family member, who provides care or assistance to one who is ill.

care·giv·er

(kār'giv-ĕr)
General term for a physician, nurse, other health care practitioner, or family member/friend who cares for patients.

caregiver,

n a person providing treatment or support to a sick, disabled, or dependent individual.

Patient discussion about caregiver

Q. what have been some of the hardest things you've experienced as a parent or caregiver of an autistic child? I would like a point of view of someone with experience so I’ll now what to expect later in life.

A. The hardest thing that I experience as a parent is the ignorance from others who just don't know what autism is, how to handle it, and how rude and dysfunctional they are being towards my child without realizing it, even so called experts like educators and doctors.

More discussions about caregiver
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet men have reported being less likely to get a break from caregiving when they needed one.
On the other hand, caregiving also takes the goods and services that people acquire to meet their needs and desires and transforms them into an effective state of wellbeing.
Having "say" over the circumstances of life has been identified as a coping strategy in relation to both caregiving and suffering.
The National Alliance for Caregiving (1997) reported the following findings:
Their results fully upheld the predictions of the revised GCT for fathers' caregiving behavior: it was predicted by perceived reflected-appraisals and SGM, but not fathers' own caregiving identity.
population over the age of 18, approximately one-fifth (21%) of both the White and African-American populations provide informal care, while a slightly lower percentage of Asian-Americans (18%) and Hispanic-Americans (16%) are engaged in caregiving.
The Healthy Balance Research Program (HBRP) in Nova Scotia has extensively studied the causes underlying women's disproportionate share of caregiving responsibilities and the accompanying negative health effects, especially the experience of negative stress.
You can also look into hiring someone to help with caregiving duties.
With ever-increasing numbers of elderly in care facilities, it is more important than ever for staff and families to develop mutually acceptable roles as they share caregiving.
Discussing principles for therapeutic work with caregiving men, Femiano and Coonerty-Femiano (2002) include such imperatives as the need for validation, strength building and control, recognizing unexpressed feelings, fostering emotional and social support, and assisting with practical concerns and future planning.
The April 2004 report by the National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC) and AARP finds that 36% of black caregivers--defined as people taking care of an elderly parent or relative--spend $101 to $500 on their care recipient in a typical month.
subscription to a caregiving periodical, a denominational publication, or a magazine that reflects a favorite pastime (such as gardening or woodworking);