cardioselectivity

car·di·o·se·lec·tiv·i·ty

(kar'dē-ō-sĕ-lek-tiv'i-tē),
The relatively predominant cardiovascular pharmacologic effect of a drug with multipharmacologic effects; used especially when describing beta-blocking agents.

cardioselectivity

[-sel′əktiv′itē]
selectivity of a drug, such as a beta-adrenergic agent, for heart tissue over other tissues of the body.

car·di·o·se·lec·tiv·i·ty

(kahr'dē-ō-sĕ-lek-tiv'i-tē)
The relatively predominant cardiovascular pharmacologic effect of a drug with multipharmacologic effects; used especially when describing beta-blocking agents.

cardioselectivity

(kard?e-o-se?lek?tiv'it-e) [ cardio- + L. seligere, to separate, select]
A stronger action on receptors in the heart than on those in the lungs. It is said of beta-adrenergic blocking agents that selectively block beta-1 receptors and thus do not cause bronchospasm.

Patient care

Patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) should avoid high doses of nonselective beta-adrenergic drugs (beta blockers) because they can cause wheezing and shortness of breath. Patients with mild or moderate obstructive lung disease can safely use cardioselective beta blockers.

See: beta-adrenergic blocking agentcardioselective (kard?e-o-se?lek'tiv), adjective
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References in periodicals archive ?
Beta-blockers, even those with apparent cardioselectivity, should not be used in patients with a history of obstructive airway disease, including asthma.
Cardioselectivity is most pronounced at low doses and is lost at high doses.
A number of [beta]-blockers with different characteristics such as cardioselectivity and intrinsic sympathomimetic activity became available.