cardiac monitor


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car·di·ac mon·i·tor

an electronic monitor which, when connected to the patient, signals each heart beat with a flashing light, an electrocardiographic curve, an audible signal, or all three.

cardiac monitor

a device for the continuous observation of cardiac function. It may include electrocardiograph and oscilloscope readings, recording devices, and a visual and/or audible record of heart function and rhythm. An alarm system may be set to identify abnormal rhythms or heart rates.

car·di·ac mon·i·tor

(kahrdē-ak moni-tŏr)
An electronic monitor that, when connected to the patient, signals each heart beat with a flashing light, an electrocardiographic curve, an audible signal, or all three in combination.

cardiac monitor

A visual and/or audible recording of each electrical impulse or physical contraction of the heart.
See also: monitor
References in periodicals archive ?
The Corsens Cardiac Monitor is designed to detect cardiac contractility parameters via a series of acoustic, accelerometers and cardiac rhythm non-invasive sensors arrayed on the patient's chest.
In previous studies, conducted at the Ziv Medical Center, Safed, Israel4, the Corsens Cardiac Monitor demonstrated stable, reproducible, and consistent cardiac contractility changes in patients undergoing heart catheterization procedures.
The clinical trial published today in Circulation reports on information obtained from the use of an insertable cardiac monitor.
The Implantable Cardiac Monitor is a small, thin device, about the size of a 50-cent piece (or the size of the smallest pacemakers), which continuously monitors the electrical activity of the heart, the ECG.
The Personal Diagnostic Manager (PDM) is a hand-held, multipurpose device that automatically retrieves and stores relevant ECG data from the implanted cardiac monitor and securely relays the information through a base station to the monitoring center.
A total of 16 new cardiac monitors and a four-person telemetry unit, to monitor heart reactions when walking or active, were installed in the emergency, special care, and ambulatory care units.
To this end, the new generation of ambulatory cardiac monitors is benefiting from the convergence of light-weight materials, short-range device-to-device communications technology and ubiquitous, high QoS wide area networks.