cardiac glycoside


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Related to cardiac glycoside: digitalis, digoxin

glycoside

 [gli´ko-sīd]
any compound containing a carbohydrate molecule (sugar), particularly any such natural product in plants, convertible, by hydrolytic cleavage, into a sugar and a nonsugar component (aglycone), and named specifically for the sugar contained, such as fructoside (fructose), glucoside (glucose), or pentoside (pentose).
cardiac glycoside any of a group of glycosides occurring in certain plants (Digitalis, etc.), having a characteristic action on the contractile force of the heart muscle.

cardiac glycoside

n.
Any of several glycosides obtained chiefly from plant sources such as the foxglove, used medicinally to increase the force of contraction of heart muscle and to regulate heartbeats.

cardiac glycoside

Pharmacology A drug that blocks the Na+/K+ pump

cardiac glycoside

positive inotrope drug which increases force of cardiac contraction and reduces atrioventricular node conductivity; used to control atrial fibrillation, e.g. digoxin

glycoside

any compound containing a carbohydrate moiety (sugar), particularly any such natural product in plants, convertible, by hydrolytic cleavage, into a sugar and a nonsugar component (aglycone), and named specifically after the sugar contained, as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc.

cardiac glycoside
any one of a group of glycosides occurring in certain plants (e.g. Digitalis) having a characteristic action on the contractile force of the heart muscle. See also cardenolide, bufadienolide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Plant-derived cardiac glycosides such as digoxin are used for the treatment of congestive heart failure and other cardiac disorders (1).
05) Figure 1: Cardiac glycoside contents of detoxified TSM Raw TSM 4.
Tiny doses of cardiac glycosides increase the force of the heartbeat while slowing its rate, and physicians have long prescribed these drugs for patients with heart failure.
Digitalis-like immunoreactive factor (DLIF) [3] and its structurally related form dihydrodigoxin-like immunoreactive factor (Dh-DLIF) are endogenous mammalian cardenolides with molecular features remarkably similar to those of the plant-derived cardiac glycosides dig-x;, and d;1-drodigoxin (1, 2).
5 [micro]g/well of BSA-conjugated cardiac glycoside diluted in carbonate-bicarbonate coating buffer containing 15 mmol/L [Na.
To verify the purity of the cardiac glycosides, we used HPLC with a [C.
Drugs used for treatment of congestive heart failure include cardiac glycosides such as digoxin and digitoxin, diuretics (e.
Our antiserum, like others described, recognized similar cardiac glycosides but cross-reacted little with endogenous steroids [6,23,24].
It is also the fastest working of all cardiac glycosides, with a significantly different mode of action and a larger therapeutic range which means a smaller risk for unwanted side effects.
First described in 1785 by William Withering, cardiac glycosides have been used in the treatment of heart failure for > 200 years, [1] and digoxin had been the most commonly used of these compounds.
Antidotes are only of potential value in the treatment of plants containing cardiac glycosides and those that present with cholinergic and anticholinergic toxidromes.