cardenolide


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car·den·o·lide

(kar-den'ō-līd),
A class of cardiac glycosides containing a five-membered lactone ring (for example, the Digitalis glycosides).

cardenolide

one of the two groups of naturally occurring cardiac glycosides; found in plants including Digitalis, Nerium, Thevetia, Cryptostegia, Euonymus, Gomphocarpus, Asclepias, Corchorus, Convallaria, Gerbera, Adonis, Acokanthera spp. Those from Digitalis spp. are used medicinally.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cardenolide glycosides of the drug are qualitatively digitoxin-like in their action, but generally weaker, probably due to the lower rate of absorption.
While some plant families responded to elevated carbon dioxide by increasing cardenolide production, most decreased production by as much as 50 percent.
Evolutionary and ecological implications of cardenolide sequestration in the monarch butterfly.
1991, "A cardenolide tetraglyoside from Oxystelma esculentum, " Phytochemistry, 30, pp.
In addition, depending on the specific type of cardenolide involved, linearly linked sugars extend from the aglycone C-3 position.
Cryptosin-a new cardenolide in tissue culture and intact plants of Cryptolepis buchanani Roem & Schult.
It has not yet been established which mammalian cardenolide would be the best candidate as a biomarker for HF or which combination in blood would best be suited as early biomarkers.
The signal intensity is inversely proportional to the amount of cardiac glycoside or mammalian cardenolide in the well.
a cardenolide whose steroid moiety has the cis-trans-cis configuration between its ring junctions.
Cardenolides are a secondary chemical that milkweeds use as a defense compound; many plant and animal species use cardenolides in this manner, in particular, monarch butterfly larva sequester them from feeding on milkweed.
Molecules with similar structures include cardenolides, such as digoxin and digitoxin, which are known substrates of ABC transporters (de Lan noy and Silverman 1992; Cavet et al.