carcinogenic potency

carcinogenic potency

The incremental excess cancer risk per unit of exposure to a chemical, which is expressed in µg/L for water, mg/kg/day for food and µg/m3 for air. The carcinogenic potency can be estimated by calculating Q1.
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We estimate carcinogenic potency by fitting a dose-response function to tumor incidence data from groups of 50 inbred rodents--or from somewhat larger groups of working-age people--and simply pronounce the group potency estimate relevant for hundreds of millions of outbred humans, who among them exhibit every conceivable genetic polymorphism, co-exposure, psychological stress factor, and disease status that is deliberately engineered out of the laboratory or attenuated in the epidemiological raw material.
As it had with previous NATAs, EPA noted that there is a potential cancer risk from diesel PM, but that the available data is inadequate to support a quantitative estimate of the carcinogenic potency of diesel PM.
But the carcinogenic potency of mice exposed to dioxin is perhaps 10 million times the carcinogenic potency of rats exposed to saccharin, whereas for the same chemical the potencies usually agree to within a factor of 10.
Carcinogenic potency of stilbestrol and estrone on strain C3H mice.
Using US Environmental Protection Agency data as a guide for carcinogenic potency it showed that these chemicals are accountable for 2% of the lung cancer risk associated with smoking cigarettes.
Lois Swirsky Gold, who directs the Carcinogenic Potency Database at the University of California, Berkeley, says that she isn't convinced that the data reflect an increase in tumors with dose.
Lois Swirsky Gold is Director of the Carcinogenic Potency Project and a Senior Scientist at the University of California, Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
Authors Bruce Ames (who developed the "Ames test" used to identify carcinogens) and Lois Gold (director of the Carcinogenic Potency Project at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Center) point out that naturally occurring rodent carcinogens have been identified in a long list of ordinary food and drink, including lettuce and tomatoes; potatoes and corn; broccoli, cabbage, and peas; hamburgers; orange juice and chocolate milk; black pepper; wine and beer; and common tap water.
For instance, the Carcinogenic Potency Database (Gold 2010) includes results from chronic, long-term animal cancer tests with mice, rats, and hamsters amounting to a total of 6,540 individual experiments with 1,547 chemicals; 751 of those chemicals (51%) have positive findings in rodent studies.
Gold, director of the Carcinogenic Potency Project at the University of California, Berkeley.
More work may be necessary in order to assess the carcinogenic potency and to assign a carcinogenic risk value to MTBE, but its carcinogenicity in animals has been established.