carboxyhaemoglobin


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car·box·y·he·mo·glo·bin

(kahr-bok'sē-hē'mŏ-glō'bin)
A stable union of carbon monoxide with hemoglobin. The formation of carboxyhemoglobin prevents the normal transfer of carbon dioxide and oxygen during the circulation of blood; thus, increasing levels of carboxyhemoglobin result in various degrees of asphyxiation, including death.
Synonym(s): carbon monoxide hemoglobin, carboxyhaemoglobin.

carboxyhaemoglobin

The stable compound formed between CARBON MONOXIDE and HAEMOGLOBIN that does not readily dissociate. As a result, the oxygen carrying power of the blood is limited. A high level of carboxyhaemoglobin is the cause of death in carbon monoxide poisoning as from car exhaust.

carboxyhaemoglobin

a stable compound produced when carbon monoxide combines irreversibly with HAEMOGLOBIN in the red blood cells, giving the blood a bright red colour. A consequence of the reaction is that haemoglobin is less able to combine freely with oxygen. This can lead to poisoning by lack of oxygen in the blood and eventually death if there is sufficient carbon monoxide in the atmosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
A high level of carboxyhaemoglobin is found in active smokers and passive smokers and that it persists longer than was previously thought after each tobacco intake resulting in chronic hypercarboxyhaemoglobinaemia, which greatly influences placental coefficient.
When carbon monoxide combines with haemoglobin it forms carboxyhaemoglobin and methaemoglobin which reduces the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood and can result in hypoxic stress (Alp et al 2006).
Carboxyhaemoglobin is bright red and most pulse oximeters cannot distinguish between it and oxyhaemogtobin, producing falsely high readings.
Sample pre-treatment for CO-oximetric de ermina ion of carboxyhaemoglobin in pu refied blood and cavi y fluid.
Introduction of CO which has over 240 times greater affinity for joining with haemoglobin than oxygen, causes creation of carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb), which renders the transport of [O.
Carbon monoxide exposure results in increased carboxyhaemoglobin, leading to a reduction in placental oxygen delivery, and causes low birth weight and an increase in perinatal death.
One of the problems encountered in measuring oxyhaemoglobin, were the small errors arising from other pigments in the blood, including methaemoglobin, carboxyhaemoglobin and sulfhaemoglobin, as well as reduced haemoglobin.
Further tests carried out on one blood sample, showed the presence of drugs such as Fluoxetine, known as Prozac and other related breakdown products, and Albendazole, an active ingredient in medication prescribed for the treatment of worms, as well as a high level of carboxyhaemoglobin, an indicator of a large amount of carbon monoxide in the blood.
This dose equivalence is consistent with the reported three to fivefold greater levels of carboxyhaemoglobin (a marker of carbon monoxide exposure) and tar inhaled when smoking a cannabis joint compared with a tobacco cigarette of the same size.
The high concentration of oxygen you breathe in helps the body make oxyhaemoglobin quickly and replace carboxyhaemoglobin.
Greater levels of carboxyhaemoglobin decrease choroidal blood flow.
There were no major differences in the certified cause of death, extent of burns or carboxyhaemoglobin concentrations in older or younger victims.