carbonated drink


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Related to carbonated drink: carbonated water

fizzy drink

A UK term of art for a carbonated beverage available for purchase in 170 cc to 2-litre cans or bottles in developed countries as well as the United States, which have been targeted as a major culprit in the rise of obesity worldwide due to generally high sugar content.

carbonated drink

A fluid infused with carbon dioxide and consumed for hydration or refreshment, such as a cola or other soft drink.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company redesigned its carbonated drinks machine with kitchenware company Lakeland and will produce the concentrates in a range of preservative and additive-free fruit flavours targeting the family market.
Caffeine in carbonated drinks has been blamed for preventing children sleeping at nights resulting in them being blearyeyed and unable to concentrate at school, making them more reliable on such drinks.
The sales volume of carbonated drinks dipped nearly 2% in the USA during last year.
In Germany, the largest market for carbonated drinks, low-calorie products make up 14% of total soft drinks consumption and in Spain, where the hot weather makes carbonated drinks a popular option, just 1 in 8 soft drinks consumed are low-calorie options.
The Federal Competition Commission said Coca-Cola's Mexico affiliates "undertake commercial practices that, given their dominant position in the national market for carbonated drinks, constitute violations of the Federal Economic Competition Law.
He said that while the carbonated drinks market was flat, non-carbonated drinks, like iced tea and flavoured water, were booming and this would lead to demand for new kinds of dispensers that IMI could supply.
The majority of Indian consumers (75%) still consume non-alcoholic store-bought beverages 'less than once a day', highlighting a large untapped market opportunity, particularly in the carbonated drinks and juice or juice-based categories (estimated to be worth $1.